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Magic Rules Changes

Commander to Magic 2012

General

CommanderMagic 2012
103.6.103.6.

In a Planar Magic game, the starting player moves the top card of his or her planar deck off that planar deck and turns it face up. (See rule 901, "Planar Magic.")

In a Planechase game, the starting player moves the top card of his or her planar deck off that planar deck and turns it face up. (See rule 901, "Planechase.")

107.11.107.11.

The planeswalker symbol is {PW}. It appears on one face of the planar die used in the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

The Planeswalker symbol is {PW}. It appears on one face of the planar die used in the Planechase casual variant. See rule 901, "Planechase."

107.12.107.12.

The chaos symbol is {C}. It appears on one face of the planar die used in the Planar Magic casual variant, as well as in triggered abilities that refer to the results of rolling the planar die. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

The chaos symbol is {C}. It appears on one face of the planar die used in the Planechase casual variant, as well as in triggered abilities that refer to the results of rolling the planar die. See rule 901, "Planechase."

108.3a.108.3a.

In a Planar Magic game using the single planar deck option, the planar controller is considered to be the owner of all the plane cards. See rule 901.6.

In a Planechase game using the single planar deck option, the planar controller is considered to be the owner of all the plane cards. See rule 901.6.

109.4a.109.4a.

In a Planar Magic game, a face-up plane card is controlled by the player designated as the planar controller. This is usually the active player. See rule 901.6.

In a Planechase game, a face-up plane card is controlled by the player designated as the planar controller. This is usually the active player. See rule 901.6.

112.6n.112.6n.

Abilities of emblems, plane cards, vanguard cards, and scheme cards function in the command zone. See rule 113, "Emblems"; rule 901, "Planar Magic"; rule 902, "Vanguard"; and rule 904, "Archenemy."

Abilities of emblems, plane cards, vanguard cards, and scheme cards function in the command zone. See rule 113, "Emblems"; rule 901, "Planechase"; rule 902, "Vanguard"; and rule 904, "Archenemy."

115.2f.115.2f.

In a Planar Magic game, rolling the planar die is a special action. A player can take this action any time he or she has priority and the stack is empty during a main phase of his or her turn. Taking this action costs a player an amount of mana equal to the number of times he or she has previously taken this action on that turn. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

In a Planechase game, rolling the planar die is a special action. A player can take this action any time he or she has priority and the stack is empty during a main phase of his or her turn. Taking this action costs a player an amount of mana equal to the number of times he or she has previously taken this action on that turn. See rule 901, "Planechase."

204.3m.204.3m.

Planes have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planar types. The planar types are Alara, Arkhos, Bolas's Meditation Realm, Dominaria, Equilor, Iquatana, Ir, Kaldheim, Kamigawa, Karsus, Lorwyn, Luvion, Mercadia, Mirrodin, Moag, Muraganda, Phyrexia, Pyrulea, Rabiah, Rath, Ravnica, Segovia, Serra's Realm, Shadowmoor, Shandalar, Ulgrotha, Valla, Wildfire, and Zendikar.

Planes have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planar types. The planar types are Alara, Arkhos, Bolas's Meditation Realm, Dominaria, Equilor, Iquatana, Ir, Kaldheim, Kamigawa, Karsus, Kinshala, Lorwyn, Luvion, Mercadia, Mirrodin, Moag, Muraganda, Phyrexia, Pyrulea, Rabiah, Rath, Ravnica, Segovia, Serra's Realm, Shadowmoor, Shandalar, Ulgrotha, Valla, Wildfire, and Zendikar.

309.1.309.1.

Plane is a card type seen only on nontraditional Magic cards. Only the Planar Magic casual variant uses plane cards. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

Plane is a card type seen only on nontraditional Magic cards. Only the Planechase casual variant uses plane cards. See rule 901, "Planechase."

408.3.408.3.

In the Planar Magic, Vanguard, Commander, and Archenemy casual variants, nontraditional Magic cards and/or specially designated cards start the game in the command zone. Each variant has its own rules regarding such cards. See section 9, "Casual Variants."

In the Planechase, Vanguard, Commander, and Archenemy casual variants, nontraditional Magic cards and/or specially designated cards start the game in the command zone. Each variant has its own rules regarding such cards. See section 9, "Casual Variants."

510.1c.510.1c.

A blocked creature assigns its combat damage to the creatures blocking it. If no creatures are currently blocking it (if, for example, they were destroyed or removed from combat), it assigns no combat damage. If exactly one creature is blocking it, it assigns all its combat damage to that creature. If two or more creatures are blocking it, it assigns its combat damage to those creatures according to the damage assignment order announced for it. This may allow the blocked creature to divide its combat damage. However, it can't assign combat damage to a creature that's blocking it unless each creature that precedes that blocking creature in its order is assigned lethal damage. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that's being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that's actually dealt. An amount of damage that's greater than a creature's lethal damage may be assigned to it.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). Craw Wurm can assign 3 damage to the Wall and 3 damage to the Cadet, 4 damage to the Wall and 2 damage to the Cadet, 5 damage to the Wall and 1 damage to the Cadet, or 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). During the declare blockers step, the defending player casts Giant Growth targeting Wall of Wood, which gives it +3/+3 until end of turn. Craw Wurm must assign its 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). During the declare blockers step, the defending player casts Mending Hands targeting Wall of Wood, which prevents the next 4 damage that would be dealt to it. Craw Wurm can assign 3 damage to the Wall and 3 damage to the Cadet, 4 damage to the Wall and 2 damage to the Cadet, 5 damage to the Wall and 1 damage to the Cadet, or 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Enormous Baloth (a 7/7 creature) is Trained Armodon (a 3/3 creature) that already has 2 damage marked on it, then Foriysian Brigade (a 2/4 creature that can block an additional creature), then Silverback Ape (a 5/5 creature). The damage assignment order of an attacking Durkwood Boars (a 4/4 creature) is the same Foriysian Brigade, then Goblin Piker (a 2/1 creature). Among other possibilities, the active player may have the Baloth assign 1 damage to the Armodon, 1 damage to the Brigade, and 5 damage to the Ape, and have the Boars assign 3 damage to the Brigade and 1 damage to the Piker.

A blocked creature assigns its combat damage to the creatures blocking it. If no creatures are currently blocking it (if, for example, they were destroyed or removed from combat), it assigns no combat damage. If exactly one creature is blocking it, it assigns all its combat damage to that creature. If two or more creatures are blocking it, it assigns its combat damage to those creatures according to the damage assignment order announced for it. This may allow the blocked creature to divide its combat damage. However, it can't assign combat damage to a creature that's blocking it unless, when combat damage assignments are complete, each creature that precedes that blocking creature in its order is assigned lethal damage. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that's being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that's actually dealt. An amount of damage that's greater than a creature's lethal damage may be assigned to it.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). Craw Wurm can assign 3 damage to the Wall and 3 damage to the Cadet, 4 damage to the Wall and 2 damage to the Cadet, 5 damage to the Wall and 1 damage to the Cadet, or 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). During the declare blockers step, the defending player casts Giant Growth targeting Wall of Wood, which gives it +3/+3 until end of turn. Craw Wurm must assign its 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Craw Wurm (a 6/4 creature) is Wall of Wood (a 0/3 creature) then Eager Cadet (a 1/1 creature). During the declare blockers step, the defending player casts Mending Hands targeting Wall of Wood, which prevents the next 4 damage that would be dealt to it. Craw Wurm can assign 3 damage to the Wall and 3 damage to the Cadet, 4 damage to the Wall and 2 damage to the Cadet, 5 damage to the Wall and 1 damage to the Cadet, or 6 damage to the Wall.

Example: The damage assignment order of an attacking Enormous Baloth (a 7/7 creature) is Trained Armodon (a 3/3 creature) that already has 2 damage marked on it, then Foriysian Brigade (a 2/4 creature that can block an additional creature), then Silverback Ape (a 5/5 creature). The damage assignment order of an attacking Durkwood Boars (a 4/4 creature) is the same Foriysian Brigade, then Goblin Piker (a 2/1 creature). Among other possibilities, the active player may have the Baloth assign 1 damage to the Armodon, 1 damage to the Brigade, and 5 damage to the Ape, and have the Boars assign 3 damage to the Brigade and 1 damage to the Piker.

510.1d.510.1d.

A blocking creature assigns combat damage to the creatures it's blocking. If it isn't currently blocking any creatures (if, for example, they were destroyed or removed from combat), it assigns no combat damage. If it's blocking exactly one creature, it assigns all its combat damage to that creature. If it's blocking two or more creatures, it assigns its combat damage to those creatures according to the damage assignment order announced for it. This may allow the blocking creature to divide its combat damage. However, it can't assign combat damage to a creature that it's blocking unless each creature that precedes that blocked creature is assigned lethal damage. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that's being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that's actually dealt. An amount of damage that's greater than a creature's lethal damage may be assigned to it.

A blocking creature assigns combat damage to the creatures it's blocking. If it isn't currently blocking any creatures (if, for example, they were destroyed or removed from combat), it assigns no combat damage. If it's blocking exactly one creature, it assigns all its combat damage to that creature. If it's blocking two or more creatures, it assigns its combat damage to those creatures according to the damage assignment order announced for it. This may allow the blocking creature to divide its combat damage. However, it can't assign combat damage to a creature that it's blocking unless, when combat damage assignments are complete, each creature that precedes that blocked creature is assigned lethal damage. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that's being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that's actually dealt. An amount of damage that's greater than a creature's lethal damage may be assigned to it.

510.1e.

Each creature's damage must be assigned fully before another creature's damage may be assigned.

510.1f.510.1e.

Once a player has assigned combat damage from each attacking or blocking creature he or she controls, the total damage assignment is checked to see if it complies with the above rules. If it doesn't, the combat damage assignment is illegal; the game returns to the moment before that player began to assign combat damage. (See rule 716, "Handling Illegal Actions").

Once a player has assigned combat damage from each attacking or blocking creature he or she controls, the total damage assignment (not solely the damage assignment of any individual attacking or blocking creature) is checked to see if it complies with the above rules. If it doesn't, the combat damage assignment is illegal; the game returns to the moment before that player began to assign combat damage. (See rule 716, "Handling Illegal Actions").

700.6.700.6.

The term dies means "is put into a graveyard from the battlefield." It is used only when referring to creatures. (This term will be introduced in the Magic 2012 core set. Some older cards will receive updated wordings in the mid-July 2011 Oracle update. These updates will not affect how those cards function.)

The term dies means "is put into a graveyard from the battlefield." It is used only when referring to creatures.

701.20a.701.20a.

A player may planeswalk only during a Planar Magic game. Only the planar controller may planeswalk. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

A player may planeswalk only during a Planechase game. Only the planar controller may planeswalk. See rule 901, "Planechase."

712.1.712.1.

One card (Time Stop) ends the turn. When an effect ends the turn, follow these steps in order, as they differ from the normal process for resolving spells and abilities (see rule 608, "Resolving Spells and Abilities").

Two cards (Time Stop and Sundial of the Infinite) end the turn. When an effect ends the turn, follow these steps in order, as they differ from the normal process for resolving spells and abilities (see rule 608, "Resolving Spells and Abilities").

714.2a.714.2a.

As a subgame of a Planar Magic game starts, each player moves his or her planar deck from the main-game command zone to the subgame command zone and shuffles it. (Face-up plane cards remain in the main-game command zone.)

As a subgame of a Planechase game starts, each player moves his or her planar deck from the main-game command zone to the subgame command zone and shuffles it. (Face-up plane cards remain in the main-game command zone.)

714.5a.714.5a.

At the end of a subgame of a Planar Magic game, the face-up plane card is turned face down and put on the bottom of its owner's planar deck. Then each player moves his or her planar deck from the subgame command zone to the main-game command zone and shuffles it.

At the end of a subgame of a Planechase game, the face-up plane card is turned face down and put on the bottom of its owner's planar deck. Then each player moves his or her planar deck from the subgame command zone to the main-game command zone and shuffles it.

800.4a.800.4a.

When a player leaves the game, all objects (see rule 109) owned by that player leave the game, all spells and abilities controlled by that player on the stack cease to exist, and any effects which give that player control of any objects or players end. Then, if there are any objects still controlled by that player, those objects are exiled. This is not a state-based action. It happens as soon as the player leaves the game. If the player who left the game had priority at the time he or she left, priority passes to the next player in turn order who's still in the game.

Example: Alex casts Control Magic, an Aura that reads, "You control enchanted creature," on Bianca's Wall of Wood. If Alex leaves the game, so does Control Magic, and Wall of Wood reverts to Bianca's control. If, instead, Bianca leaves the game, so does Wall of Wood, and Control Magic is put into Alex's graveyard.

Example: Alex casts Threaten, which reads, in part, "Untap target creature and gain control of it until end of turn," targeting Bianca's Wall of Wood. If Alex leaves the game, Threaten's change-of-control effect ends and Wall of Wood reverts to Bianca's control.

Example: Alex casts Bribery, which reads, "Search target opponent's library for a creature card and put that card onto the battlefield under your control. Then that player shuffles his or her library," targeting Bianca. Alex puts Wall of Wood onto the battlefield from Bianca's library. If Bianca leaves the game, Wall of Wood also leaves the game. If, instead, Alex leaves the game, Wall of Wood is exiled.

Example: Alex controls Genesis Chamber, which reads, "Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield, if Genesis Chamber is untapped, that creature's controller puts a 1/1 colorless Myr artifact creature token onto the battlefield." If Alex leaves the game, all such Myr tokens that entered the battlefield under Alex's control leave the game, and all such Myr tokens that entered the battlefield under any other player's control remain in the game.

When a player leaves the game, all objects (see rule 109) owned by that player leave the game, any effects which give that player control of any objects or players end, and all spells and abilities controlled by that player on the stack cease to exist. Then, if there are any objects still controlled by that player, those objects are exiled. This is not a state-based action. It happens as soon as the player leaves the game. If the player who left the game had priority at the time he or she left, priority passes to the next player in turn order who's still in the game.

Example: Alex casts Control Magic, an Aura that reads, "You control enchanted creature," on Bianca's Wall of Wood. If Alex leaves the game, so does Control Magic, and Wall of Wood reverts to Bianca's control. If, instead, Bianca leaves the game, so does Wall of Wood, and Control Magic is put into Alex's graveyard.

Example: Alex casts Threaten, which reads, in part, "Untap target creature and gain control of it until end of turn," targeting Bianca's Wall of Wood. If Alex leaves the game, Threaten's change-of-control effect ends and Wall of Wood reverts to Bianca's control.

Example: Alex casts Bribery, which reads, "Search target opponent's library for a creature card and put that card onto the battlefield under your control. Then that player shuffles his or her library," targeting Bianca. Alex puts Wall of Wood onto the battlefield from Bianca's library. If Bianca leaves the game, Wall of Wood also leaves the game. If, instead, Alex leaves the game, Wall of Wood is exiled.

Example: Alex controls Genesis Chamber, which reads, "Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield, if Genesis Chamber is untapped, that creature's controller puts a 1/1 colorless Myr artifact creature token onto the battlefield." If Alex leaves the game, all such Myr tokens that entered the battlefield under Alex's control leave the game, and all such Myr tokens that entered the battlefield under any other player's control remain in the game.

800.4i.800.4i.

In a Planar Magic game, if the player designated as the planar controller would leave the game, instead the next player in turn order that wouldn't leave the game becomes the planar controller, then the old planar controller leaves the game. See rule 309.5.

In a Planechase game, if the player designated as the planar controller would leave the game, instead the next player in turn order that wouldn't leave the game becomes the planar controller, then the old planar controller leaves the game. See rule 309.5.

801.20.801.20.

In multiplayer Planar Magic games other than Grand Melee games, plane cards are exempt from the limited range of influence option. Their abilities, and the effects of those abilities, affect all applicable objects and players in the game. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

In multiplayer Planechase games other than Grand Melee games, plane cards are exempt from the limited range of influence option. Their abilities, and the effects of those abilities, affect all applicable objects and players in the game. See rule 901, "Planechase."

901.901.

Planar Magic

Planechase

901.1.901.1.

In the Planar Magic variant, plane cards add additional abilities and randomness to the game. At any given time, one plane card will be face up and its abilities will affect the game. The Planar Magic variant uses all the normal rules for a Magic game, with the following additions.

In the Planechase variant, plane cards add additional abilities and randomness to the game. At any given time, one plane card will be face up and its abilities will affect the game. The Planechase variant uses all the normal rules for a Magic game, with the following additions.

901.2.901.2.

A Planar Magic game may be a two-player game or a multiplayer game. The default multiplayer setup is the Free-for-All variant with the attack multiple players option and without the limited range of influence option. See rule 806, "Free-for-All Variant."

A Planechase game may be a two-player game or a multiplayer game. The default multiplayer setup is the Free-for-All variant with the attack multiple players option and without the limited range of influence option. See rule 806, "Free-for-All Variant."

901.3a.901.3a.

A planar die is a six-sided die. One face has the planeswalker symbol {PW}. One face has the chaos symbol {C}. The other faces are blank.

A planar die is a six-sided die. One face has the Planeswalker symbol {PW}. One face has the chaos symbol {C}. The other faces are blank.

901.8c.901.8c.

If the die roll is the planeswalker symbol {PW}, the plane's "planeswalking ability" triggers and is put on the stack. The active player gets priority.

If the die roll is the Planeswalker symbol {PW}, the plane's "planeswalking ability" triggers and is put on the stack. The active player gets priority.

901.11.901.11.

A Two-Headed Giant Planar Magic game uses all the rules for the Two-Headed Giant multiplayer variant and all the rules for the Planar Magic casual variant, with the following additions.

A Two-Headed Giant Planechase game uses all the rules for the Two-Headed Giant multiplayer variant and all the rules for the Planechase casual variant, with the following additions.

901.13.901.13.

In Grand Melee Planar Magic games, multiple plane cards may be face up at the same time.

In Grand Melee Planechase games, multiple plane cards may be face up at the same time.

901.14a.901.14a.

As an alternative option, a Planar Magic game may be played with just a single communal planar deck. In that case, the number of cards in the planar deck must be at least forty or at least ten times the number of players in the game, whichever is smaller. Each card in the planar deck must have a different English name.

As an alternative option, a Planechase game may be played with just a single communal planar deck. In that case, the number of cards in the planar deck must be at least forty or at least ten times the number of players in the game, whichever is smaller. Each card in the planar deck must have a different English name.

901.14b.901.14b.

In a Planar Magic game using the single planar deck option, the planar controller is considered to be the owner of all the plane cards.

In a Planechase game using the single planar deck option, the planar controller is considered to be the owner of all the plane cards.

Chaos AbilityChaos Ability

An ability of a plane card that triggers "Whenever you roll {C}" on the planar die in the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 309.7.

An ability of a plane card that triggers "Whenever you roll {C}" on the planar die in the Planechase casual variant. See rule 309.7.

Chaos SymbolChaos Symbol

The chaos symbol {C} appears on the planar die and in some triggered abilities of plane cards in the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 107.12.

The chaos symbol {C} appears on the planar die and in some triggered abilities of plane cards in the Planechase casual variant. See rule 107.12.

DiesDies

A creature "dies" if it is put into a graveyard from the battlefield. See rule 700.6. (This term will be introduced in the Magic 2012 core set. Some older cards will receive updated wordings in the mid-July 2011 Oracle update. These updates will not affect how those cards function.)

A creature "dies" if it is put into a graveyard from the battlefield. See rule 700.6.

Planar DeckPlanar Deck

A deck of at least ten plane cards needed to play the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 901.3.

A deck of at least ten plane cards needed to play the Planechase casual variant. See rule 901.3.

Planar DiePlanar Die

A specialized six-sided die needed to play the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 901.3.

A specialized six-sided die needed to play the Planechase casual variant. See rule 901.3.

PlanePlane

A card type seen only on nontraditional Magic cards in the Planar Magic casual variant. A plane card is not a permanent. See rule 309, "Planes."

A card type seen only on nontraditional Magic cards in the Planechase casual variant. A plane card is not a permanent. See rule 309, "Planes."

Planar MagicPlanechase

A casual variant in which plane cards add additional abilities and randomness to the game. See rule 901, "Planar Magic."

A casual variant in which plane cards add additional abilities and randomness to the game. See rule 901, "Planechase."

PlaneswalkPlaneswalk

To put the face-up plane card on the bottom of its owner's planar deck face down, then move the top card of your planar deck off that planar deck and turn it face up in a Planar Magic game. See rule 701.20, "Planeswalk."

To put the face-up plane card on the bottom of its owner's planar deck face down, then move the top card of your planar deck off that planar deck and turn it face up in a Planechase game. See rule 701.20, "Planeswalk."

Planeswalker SymbolPlaneswalker Symbol

The planeswalker symbol {PW} appears on the planar die in the Planar Magic casual variant. See rule 107.11.

The Planeswalker symbol {PW} appears on the planar die in the Planechase casual variant. See rule 107.11.