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Magic: The Gathering Comprehensive Rules Changes

Dissension to Coldsnap

General changes

Old rule (Dissension) New rule (Coldsnap)

104.3.

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, {X}, {Y}, {Z}, the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on, and the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}.

104.3.

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}; {X}, {Y}, {Z}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; and the snow symbol {S}.

104.3f.

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost which can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue.

Example: {G/W}{G/W} can be paid by spending {G}{G}, {G}{W}, or {W}{W}.

104.3f.

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue.

Example: {G/W}{G/W} can be paid by spending {G}{G}, {G}{W}, or {W}{W}.

104.3g.

If an effect would add one mana represented by a hybrid mana symbol to a player's mana pool, that player chooses either one of that symbol's colors and adds one mana of that color to his or her mana pool.

104.3g.

If an effect would add one mana represented by a hybrid mana symbol to a player's mana pool, that player chooses either of that symbol's colors and adds one mana of that color to his or her mana pool.

104.3h.

The snow mana symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. This is a generic mana cost that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don't affect {S} costs.

205.4e.

Any land with the supertype "snow-covered" is a snow-covered land. Any land that doesn't have this supertype is a non-snow-covered land, regardless of the name of the land.

205.4e.

Any permanent with the supertype "snow" is a snow permanent. Any permanent that doesn't have this supertype is a nonsnow permanent, regardless of its name.

212.4d.

Some enchantments have the subtype "Aura." An Aura comes into play attached to a permanent or player. What an Aura can be attached to is restricted by its enchant keyword ability (see rule 502.45, "Enchant").

212.4d.

Some enchantments have the subtype "Aura." An Aura comes into play attached to a permanent or player. What an Aura can be attached to is restricted by its enchant keyword ability (see rule 502.45, "Enchant"). Other effects can limit what a permanent can be enchanted by.

212.4e.

An Aura spell requires a target, which is restricted by its enchant ability. Other restrictions can limit what a permanent can be enchanted by. If an Aura is coming into play by any other means than being played and the effect putting it into play doesn't specify what it will enchant, the player putting it into play chooses a permanent for it to enchant as it comes into play. The player must choose a legal permanent according to the Aura's enchant ability. If an Aura is coming into play from the stack and there is no legal permanent for it to enchant, the Aura is put into its owner's graveyard instead of coming into play. If an Aura is coming into play from any zone other than the stack and there is no legal permanent for it to enchant, the Aura remains in the zone from which it attempted to move instead of coming into play. The same rule applies to moving an Aura from one permanent to another: The permanent to which the Aura is to be moved must be able to be enchanted by it. If it can't, the Aura doesn't move.

212.4e.

An Aura spell requires a target, which is restricted by its enchant ability.

212.4j.

If an Aura is coming into play by any means other than by being played and the effect putting it into play doesn't specify the permanent or player the Aura will enchant, the player putting it into play chooses what it will enchant as the Aura comes into play. The player must choose a legal permanent or player according to the Aura's enchant ability and any other applicable effects. If the player can't make a legal choice, the Aura remains in its current zone, unless that zone is the stack. In that case, the Aura is put into its owner's graveyard instead of coming into play.

212.4k.

If an effect attempts to attach an Aura in play to a permanent or player, that permanent or player must be able to be enchanted by it. If the permanent or player can't be, the Aura doesn't move.

212.6e.

If an effect changes a land's type to one or more of the basic land types, the land no longer has its old land type. It loses all abilities generated from its rules text and its old land types, and it gains the appropriate mana ability for each new basic land type. Note that this doesn't remove any abilities that were granted to the land by other effects. Changing a land's type doesn't add or remove any types (such as creature) or supertypes (such as basic, legendary, and snow-covered) the land may have. If a land gains one or more land types in addition to its own, it keeps its land types and rules text, and it gains the new land types and mana abilities.

212.6e.

If an effect changes a land's type to one or more of the basic land types, the land no longer has its old land type. It loses all abilities generated from its rules text and its old land types, and it gains the appropriate mana ability for each new basic land type. Note that this doesn't remove any abilities that were granted to the land by other effects. Changing a land's subtype doesn't add or remove any types (such as creature) or supertypes (such as basic, legendary, and snow) the land may have. If a land gains one or more land types in addition to its own, it keeps its land types and rules text, and it gains the new land types and mana abilities.

217.7d.

An object may have an ability that refers to "the removed cards" or to cards "removed from the game with [name]." If the ability is printed on that object, it refers only to cards in the removed-from-the-game zone removed by that object as an effect of an ability printed on it. If that ability is printed on a different object, it refers only to cards in the removed-from-the-game zone removed by that object as an effect of an ability copied from the same object at the same time.

Example: Arc-Slogger has the ability "{R}: Remove the top ten cards of your library from the game: Arc-Slogger deals 2 damage to target creature or player." Sisters of Stone Death has the ability "{B}{G}: Remove from the game target creature blocking or blocked by Sisters of Stone Death" and the ability "{2}{B}: Put a creature card removed from the game with Sisters of Stone Death into play under your control." Quicksilver Elemental has the ability "{U}: Quicksilver Elemental gains all activated abilities of target creature until end of turn." If a player has Quicksilver Elemental gain Arc-Slogger's ability, plays it, then has Quicksilver Elemental gain Sisters of Stone Death's abilities, plays the remove-from-game ability, and then plays the return-to-play ability, only the creature card Quicksilver Elemental removed from the game with Sisters of Stone Death's ability can be returned to play. Creature cards Quicksilver Elemental removed from the game with Arc-Slogger's ability can't be returned.

217.7d.

A card may have one ability printed on it that removes one or more cards from the game, and another ability that refers either to "the removed cards" or to cards "removed from the game with [name]." These abilities are linked: the second refers only to cards in the removed-from-the-game zone removed as a result of the first. If another object copies both abilities, the abilities will be similarly linked on that object. They can't be linked to any other ability, regardless of what other abilities the object may currently have or may have had in the past.

Example: Arc-Slogger has the ability "{R}: Remove the top ten cards of your library from the game: Arc-Slogger deals 2 damage to target creature or player." Sisters of Stone Death has the ability "{B}{G}: Remove from the game target creature blocking or blocked by Sisters of Stone Death" and the ability "{2}{B}: Put a creature card removed from the game with Sisters of Stone Death into play under your control." Quicksilver Elemental has the ability "{U}: Quicksilver Elemental gains all activated abilities of target creature until end of turn." If a player has Quicksilver Elemental gain Arc-Slogger's ability, plays it, then has Quicksilver Elemental gain Sisters of Stone Death's abilities, plays the remove-from-game ability, and then plays the return-to-play ability, only the creature card Quicksilver Elemental removed from the game with Sisters of Stone Death's ability can be returned to play. Creature cards Quicksilver Elemental removed from the game with Arc-Slogger's ability can't be returned.

405.2.

Some objects have intrinsic static abilities which state that the object "has" one or more characteristic values; "is" a particular type, supertype, subtype, or color; or that one or more of its characteristics "is" or "are" a particular value. These abilities are characteristic-setting abilities. Abilities of an object that affect the characteristics of another object are not characteristic-setting abilities; neither are abilities that an object grants to itself. See rule 201, "Characteristics," and rule 418.5a.

405.2.

Some objects have intrinsic static abilities which state that the object "has" one or more characteristic values; "is" one or more particular types, supertypes, subtypes, or colors; or that one or more of its characteristics "is" or "are" a particular value. These abilities are characteristic-setting abilities. Abilities of an object that affect the characteristics of another object are not characteristic-setting abilities; neither are abilities that an object grants to itself. See rule 201, "Characteristics," and rule 418.5a.

405.2a.

A characteristic-setting ability that states that an object is a particular type, supertype, subtype, or color applies no matter which zone the object it's on is in. This rule doesn't apply to other characteristic-setting abilities.

405.2a.

A characteristic-setting ability that states that an object is one or more particular types, supertypes, subtypes, or colors applies no matter which zone the object it's on is in. This rule doesn't apply to other characteristic-setting abilities.

413.2e.

If an effect gives a player the option to pay mana, he or she may play mana abilities as part of the action. No other spells or abilities can normally be played during resolution.

413.2e.

If an effect gives a player the option to pay mana, he or she may play mana abilities before taking that action. If an effect specifically instructs or allows a player to play a spell during resolution, he or she does so by putting that spell on top of the stack, then continuing to play it by following the steps in rules 409.1a-i (except no player receives priority after it's played). The currently resolving spell or ability then continues to resolve, which may include playing other spells this way. No other spells or abilities can normally be played during resolution.

419.6g.

Some replacement effects say "instead choose one -." Such effects are called modal replacement effects. The mode is chosen as the replacement effect is applied. If a modal replacement effect would apply to multiple events, a different mode may be chosen for each event. A modal replacement effect doesn't invoke itself repeatedly, regardless of which mode was chosen. You may not choose modes that are impossible.

420.5d.

An Aura attached to an illegal permanent or not attached to a permanent is put into its owner's graveyard.

420.5d.

An Aura attached to an illegal permanent or player, or not attached to a permanent or player, is put into its owner's graveyard.

502.6a.

Landwalk and snow-covered landwalk are generic terms; a card's rules text will give a specific subtype or supertype (such as in "islandwalk," "snow-covered swampwalk," or "legendary landwalk").

502.6a.

Landwalk and snow landwalk are generic terms; a card's rules text will give a specific subtype or supertype (such as in "islandwalk," "snow swampwalk," or "legendary landwalk").

502.6b.

Landwalk and snow-covered landwalk are evasion abilities. A creature with landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one land with the specified subtype and/or supertype. (See rule 309, "Declare Blockers Step.")

502.6b.

Landwalk and snow landwalk are evasion abilities. A creature with landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one land with the specified subtype and/or supertype. (See rule 309, "Declare Blockers Step.")

502.6c.

Snow-covered landwalk is a special type of landwalk. A creature with snow-covered landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one snow-covered land with the specified subtype. If a player is allowed to choose any landwalk ability, that player may choose a snow-covered landwalk ability. If an effect causes a permanent to lose all landwalk abilities, snow-covered landwalk abilities are removed as well.

502.6c.

Snow landwalk is a special type of landwalk. A creature with snow landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one snow land with the specified subtype. If a player is allowed to choose any landwalk ability, that player may choose a snow landwalk ability. If an effect causes a permanent to lose all landwalk abilities, snow landwalk abilities are removed as well.

502.6d.

Landwalk or snow-covered landwalk abilities don't "cancel" one another.

Example: If a player controls a snow-covered Forest, that player can't block an attacking creature with snow-covered forestwalk even if he or she also controls a creature with snow-covered forestwalk.

502.6d.

Landwalk or snow landwalk abilities don't "cancel" one another.

Example: If a player controls a snow Forest, that player can't block an attacking creature with snow forestwalk even if he or she also controls a creature with snow forestwalk.

502.6e.

Multiple instances of the same type of landwalk or snow-covered landwalk on the same creature are redundant.

502.6e.

Multiple instances of the same type of landwalk or snow landwalk on the same creature are redundant.

502.13a.

Cumulative upkeep is a triggered ability that imposes an increasing cost on a permanent. "Cumulative upkeep [cost]" means "At the beginning of your upkeep, put an age counter on this permanent, then sacrifice this permanent unless you pay [cost] for each age counter on it."

502.13a.

Cumulative upkeep is a triggered ability that imposes an increasing cost on a permanent. "Cumulative upkeep [cost]" means "At the beginning of your upkeep, put an age counter on this permanent, then sacrifice this permanent unless you pay [cost] for each age counter on it." If [cost] has choices associated with it, each choice is made separately for each age counter, then either the entire set of costs is paid, or none of them is paid. Partial payments aren't allowed.

Example: A creature has "Cumulative upkeep {W} or {U}" and two age counters on it. When its ability next triggers and resolves, the creature's controller puts an age counter on it and then may pay {W}{W}{W}, {W}{W}{U}, {W}{U}{U}, or {U}{U}{U} to keep the creature in play.

Example: A creature has "Cumulative upkeep-Sacrifice a creature" and one age counter on it. When its ability next triggers and resolves, its controller can't choose the same creature to sacrifice twice. Either two different creatures must be sacrificed, or the creature with cumulative upkeep must be sacrificed.

502.45d.

Auras that can enchant a player can target and be attached to players. Such Auras can't target permanents and can't be attached to permanents. Rules 212.4d-i apply to an Aura with the "enchant player" or "enchant opponent" ability in relation to players as they normally would for permanents.

502.45d.

Auras that can enchant a player can target and be attached to players. Such Auras can't target permanents and can't be attached to permanents. Rules 212.4d-k apply to an Aura with the "enchant player" or "enchant opponent" ability in relation to players as they normally would for permanents.

502.55.

Recover

502.55a.

Recover is a triggered ability that functions only while the card with recover is in a player's graveyard. "Recover [cost]" means "When a creature is put into your graveyard from play, you may pay [cost]. If you do, return this card from your graveyard to your hand. Otherwise, remove this card from the game."

502.56.

Ripple

502.56a.

Ripple is a triggered ability that functions only while the card with ripple is on the stack. "Ripple N" means "When you play this spell, you may reveal the top N cards of your library, or, if there are fewer than N cards in your library, you may reveal all the cards in your library. If you reveal cards from your library this way, you may play any of those cards with the same name as this spell without paying their mana costs, then put all revealed cards not played this way on the bottom of your library in any order."

502.56b.

If a spell has multiple instances of ripple, each triggers separately.

505.2.

In every zone except the stack, split cards have two sets of characteristics. As long as a split card is a spell on the stack, only the characteristics of the half being played exist. The other half's characteristics are treated as though they didn't exist.

505.2.

In every zone except the stack, split cards have two sets of characteristics and two converted mana costs. As long as a split card is a spell on the stack, only the characteristics of the half being played exist. The other half's characteristics are treated as though they didn't exist.

505.5.

Effects that ask for a particular characteristic of a split card while it's in a zone other than the stack get two answers (one for each of the split card's two halves).

Example: Infernal Genesis has an ability that reads, "At the beginning of each player's upkeep, that player puts the top card from his or her library into his or her graveyard. He or she then puts X 1/1 black Minion creature tokens into play, where X is that card's converted mana cost." If the top card of your library is Assault/Battery when this ability resolves, the game sees its converted mana cost as "1, and 4." You get five creature tokens.

505.5.

An effect that asks for a particular characteristic of a split card while it's in a zone other than the stack gets two answers (one for each of the split card's two halves).

Example: Infernal Genesis has an ability that reads, "At the beginning of each player's upkeep, that player puts the top card from his or her library into his or her graveyard. He or she then puts X 1/1 black Minion creature tokens into play, where X is that card's converted mana cost." If the top card of your library is Assault/Battery when this ability resolves, the game sees its converted mana cost as "1, and 4." You get five creature tokens.

505.6.

Effects that ask if a split card's characteristic (in any zone other than the stack) matches a given value get only one answer. This answer is "yes" if either side of the split card matches the given value.

Example: Void reads, "Choose a number. Destroy all artifacts and creatures with converted mana cost equal to that number. Then target player reveals his or her hand and discards all nonland cards with converted mana cost equal to the number." If a player plays Void and chooses 1, his or her opponent would discard Assault/Battery because the game sees its converted mana cost as "1, and 4." The same is true if the player chooses 4. If the player chooses 5, however, Assault/Battery would be unaffected.

505.6.

An effect that performs a positive comparison (such as asking if a card is red) or a relative comparison (such as asking if a card's converted mana cost is less than 2) involving characteristics of one or more split cards in any zone other than the stack gets only one answer. This answer is "yes" if either side of those split cards would return a "yes" answer if compared individually. An effect that performs a negative comparison (such as asking if cards have different names) involving characteristics of one or more split cards in any zone other than the stack also gets only one answer. This answer is "yes" if performing the comparable positive comparison would return a "no" answer.

Example: Void reads, "Choose a number. Destroy all artifacts and creatures with converted mana cost equal to that number. Then target player reveals his or her hand and discards all nonland cards with converted mana cost equal to the number." If a player plays Void and chooses 1, his or her opponent would discard Assault/Battery because the game sees its converted mana cost as "1, and 4." The same is true if the player chooses 4. If the player chooses 5, however, Assault/Battery would be unaffected.

511.

Flipping a Coin

511.1.

To flip a coin for an object that cares whether a player wins or loses the flip, the affected player flips the coin and calls "heads" or "tails" while the coin is in the air. If the call matches the result, that player wins the flip. Otherwise, the player loses the flip. Only the player who flips the coin wins or loses the flip; no other players are involved.

511.2.

To flip a coin for an object that cares whether the coin comes up heads or tails, each affected player flips a coin without making a call. No player wins or loses this kind of flip.

511.3.

If the coin that's being flipped doesn't have an obvious "heads" or "tails," designate one side to be "heads," and the other side to be "tails." Other methods of randomization may be substituted for flipping a coin as long as there are two possible outcomes of equal likelihood and all players agree to the substitution. For example, the player may roll an even-sided die and call "odds" or "evens," or roll an even-sided die and designate that "odds" means "heads" and "evens" means "tails."

601.14b.

If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage that would be dealt by a source, it can affect only sources within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence. If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage that would be dealt to a creature or player, it can affect only creatures and players within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence. If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage, but neither the source nor the would-be recipient of the damage is specified, it prevents damage only if both the source and recipient of that damage are within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Alex controls an enchantment that says, "Prevent all damage that would be dealt by creatures." Carissa attacks Rob with a creature. The creature deals combat damage to Rob.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Carissa plays Lightning Blast ("Lightning Blast deals 4 damage to target creature or player") targeting Rob. In response, Alex plays Honorable Passage ("The next time a source of your choice would deal damage to target creature or player this turn, prevent that damage. If damage from a red source is prevented this way, Honorable Passage deals damage equal to the damage prevented this way to the source's controller.") targeting Rob. The damage to Rob is prevented, but Honorable Damage can't deal damage to Carissa.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Carissa attacks Rob with a creature, and Rob blocks with a creature. Alex plays Holy Day ("Prevent all combat damage that would be dealt this turn.") Carissa and Rob's creatures deal combat damage to each other.

601.14b.

If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage that would be dealt by a source, it can affect only sources within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence. If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage that would be dealt to a creature or player, it can affect only creatures and players within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence. If a spell or ability creates an effect that prevents damage, but neither the source nor the would-be recipient of the damage is specified, it prevents damage only if both the source and recipient of that damage are within the spell or ability's controller's range of influence.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Alex controls an enchantment that says, "Prevent all damage that would be dealt by creatures." Carissa attacks Rob with a creature. The creature deals combat damage to Rob.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Carissa plays Lightning Blast ("Lightning Blast deals 4 damage to target creature or player") targeting Rob. In response, Alex plays Honorable Passage ("The next time a source of your choice would deal damage to target creature or player this turn, prevent that damage. If damage from a red source is prevented this way, Honorable Passage deals damage equal to the damage prevented this way to the source's controller.") targeting Rob. The damage to Rob is prevented, but Honorable Passage can't deal damage to Carissa.

Example: Rob is within Alex's range of influence, but Carissa is not. Carissa attacks Rob with a creature, and Rob blocks with a creature. Alex plays Holy Day ("Prevent all combat damage that would be dealt this turn.") Carissa and Rob's creatures deal combat damage to each other.

606.9a.

If an effect needs to know the value of an individual player's life total, that effect uses the team's life total divided by two, rounded up, instead.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a team is at 17 life when a player activates Heartless Hidegetsu's ability, which reads, "Heartless Hidetsugu deals to each player damage equal to half that player's life total, rounded down." For the purposes of this ability, each player on that team is considered to be at 9 life. Heartless Hidetsugu deals 4 damage to each of those players, for a total of 8 damage. The team will end up at 9 life.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a player controls Test of Endurance, an enchantment that reads, "At the beginning of your upkeep, if you have 50 or more life, you win the game." At the beginning of your upkeep, the player's team wins the game only if his or her share of the team's life total is 50 or more. The team's life total must be 99 or more for that to happen.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a player controls Lurking Jackals, which reads, "When an opponent has 10 life or less, if Lurking Jackals is an enchantment, it becomes a 3/2 Hound creature." If the opposing team has 22 life and 1 damage to a particular opponent, Lurking Jackals won't become a creature. The opposing team's life total must be 20 or less for that to happen.

606.9a.

If an effect needs to know the value of an individual player's life total, that effect uses the team's life total divided by two, rounded up, instead.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a team is at 17 life when a player activates Heartless Hidetsugu's ability, which reads, "Heartless Hidetsugu deals to each player damage equal to half that player's life total, rounded down." For the purposes of this ability, each player on that team is considered to be at 9 life. Heartless Hidetsugu deals 4 damage to each of those players, for a total of 8 damage. The team will end up at 9 life.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a player controls Test of Endurance, an enchantment that reads, "At the beginning of your upkeep, if you have 50 or more life, you win the game." At the beginning of your upkeep, the player's team wins the game only if his or her share of the team's life total is 50 or more. The team's life total must be 99 or more for that to happen.

Example: In a Two-Headed Giant game, a player controls Lurking Jackals, which reads, "When an opponent has 10 life or less, if Lurking Jackals is an enchantment, it becomes a 3/2 Hound creature." If the opposing team has 22 life and 1 damage to a particular opponent, Lurking Jackals won't become a creature. The opposing team's life total must be 20 or less for that to happen.

Artifact Type

Artifact subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Artifact — Equipment." Artifact subtypes are also called artifact types. However, if an artifact creature card has subtypes printed on its type line, those subtypes are creature types. If an artifact land card has subtypes printed on its type line, those types are land types. The list of artifact types, updated through the Dissension (tm) set, is as follows: Equipment.

Artifact Type

Artifact subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Artifact — Equipment." Artifact subtypes are also called artifact types. However, if an artifact creature card has subtypes printed on its type line, those subtypes are creature types. If an artifact land card has subtypes printed on its type line, those types are land types. The list of artifact types, updated through the Coldsnap (tm) set, is as follows: Equipment.

Attach

To attach an Aura or Equipment to a permanent means to take it from where it currently is and put it onto that permanent. If the Aura or Equipment no longer exists or the object it will move onto is no longer in the correct zone when the effect would attach it, nothing happens. Similarly, an Aura or Equipment can't be attached to a permanent it couldn't enchant or equip. The Aura or Equipment stays where it is, with one exception: If an Aura is coming into play from the stack and there is no legal permanent for it to enchant, the Aura is put into its owner's graveyard instead of coming into play. Attaching an Aura in play to a different permanent causes the Aura to receive a new timestamp. Nothing else about the Aura changes. The Aura never left play, so no comes-into-play or leaves-play triggered abilities will trigger. If an ability of the moved Aura affecting "enchanted [permanent]" was on the stack when the Aura moved, it will affect the new enchanted permanent when it resolves, not the old one. The same is true for moved Equipment.

Attach

To attach an Aura or Equipment to a permanent means to take it from where it currently is and put it onto that permanent. If the Aura or Equipment no longer exists or the object it will move onto is no longer in the correct zone when the effect would attach it, nothing happens. Similarly, an Aura or Equipment can't be attached to a permanent it couldn't enchant or equip. The Aura or Equipment stays where it is, with one exception: If an Aura is coming into play from the stack and there is no legal permanent for it to enchant, the Aura is put into its owner's graveyard instead of coming into play. If an effect tries to attach an Aura or Equipment to the permanent it's already attached to, the effect does nothing. Attaching an Aura in play to a different permanent causes the Aura to receive a new timestamp. Nothing else about the Aura changes. The Aura never left play, so no comes-into-play or leaves-play triggered abilities will trigger. If an ability of the moved Aura affecting "enchanted [permanent]" was on the stack when the Aura moved, it will affect the new enchanted permanent when it resolves, not the old one. The same is true for moved Equipment.

Characteristic-Setting Ability

Some objects have intrinsic static abilities which state that that object "has" one or more characteristics; "is" a particular type, supertype, subtype, or color; or that one or more of its characteristics "is" or "are" a particular value. These abilities are characteristic-setting abilities. See rule 405.2.

Characteristic-Setting Ability

Some objects have intrinsic static abilities which state that that object "has" one or more characteristics; "is" one or more particular types, supertypes, subtypes, or colors; or that one or more of its characteristics "is" or "are" a particular value. These abilities are characteristic-setting abilities. See rule 405.2.

Creature Type

Creature subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Creature — Human Soldier," "Artifact Creature — Golem," and so on. Creature subtypes are also called creature types. Creatures may have multiple subtypes. The list of creature types, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: Abomination, Aboroth, Advisor, Aladdin, Albatross, Alchemist, Ali-Baba, Ali-from-Cairo, Alligator, Ambush-Party, Angel, Ant, Antelope, Ape, Archaeologist, Archer, Archon, Artificer, Asp, Assassin, Assembly-Worker, Atog, Aurochs, Avatar, Avenger, Avizoa, Badger, Ball-Lightning, Bandit, Banshee, Barbarian, Barishi, Basilisk, Bat, Bear, Beast, Bee, Beeble, Being, Berserker, Bird, Blinkmoth, Boar, Bodyguard, Bringer, Brother, Brownie, Brushwagg, Bull, Bureaucrat, Camarid, Camel, Caravan, Caribou, Carnivore, Carriage, Carrier, Cat, Cavalry, Cave-People, Centaur, Cephalid, Cheetah, Chicken, Child, Chimera, Citizen, Clamfolk, Cleric, Cobra, Cockatrice, Constable, Construct, Cow, Crab, Crocodile, Crusader, Cyclops, Dandan, Demon, Dervish, Deserter, Designer, Devil, Devouring-Deep, Dinosaur, Djinn, Dog, Donkey, Doppelganger, Dragon, Dragonfly, Drake, Dreadnought, Drill-Sergeant, Drone, Druid, Dryad, Dwarf, Eater, Eel, Effigy, Efreet, Egg, Elder, Elemental, Elephant, Elf, El-Hajjaj, Enchantress, Entity, Erne, Essence, Exorcist, Expansion-Symbol, Faerie, Fallen, Farmer, Ferret, Fiend, Fish, Flagbearer, Flying-Men, Fox, Frog, Frostbeast, Fungus, Fungusaur, Gaea's-Avenger, Gaea's-Liege, Gamer, Gargoyle, Gatekeeper, General, Ghost, Ghoul, Giant, Gnome, Goat, Goblin, Golem, Gorgon, Graveborn, Gremlin, Griffin, Guardian, Gus, Gypsy, Hag, Harlequin,Heretic, Hero, Hipparion, Hippo, Homarid, Hornet, Horror, Horse, Horseman, Hound, Human, Hunter, Hydra, Hyena, Illusion, Imp, Incarnation, Infernal-Denizen, Inquisitor, Insect, Island-Fish, Jackal, Jellyfish, Juggernaut, Kavu, Keeper, Kelp, King, Kirin, Kithkin, Knight, Kobold, Kraken, Lady-of-Proper-Etiquette, Lammasu, Leech, Legionnaire, Lemure, Leper, Leviathan, Lhurgoyf, Licid, Lizard, Lord, Lurker, Lycanthrope, Mage, Maiden, Mammoth, Manticore, Marid, Martyr, Master, Medusa, Mercenary, Merchant, Merfolk, Mime, Minion, Minor, Minotaur, Miracle-Worker, Mist, Mistfolk, Mob, Mold-Demon, Monger, Mongoose, Monk, Monster, Moonfolk, Mosquito, Mummy, Murk-Dwellers, Mutant, Myr, Mystic, Nameless-Race, Narwhal, Nephilim, Niall-Silvain, Nightmare, Nightstalker, Ninja, Noble, Nomad, Octopus, Ogre, Ooze, Orb, Orc, Orgg, Ouphe, Ox, Oyster, Paladin, Paratrooper, Peacekeeper, Pegasus, Penguin, Pentavite, People-of-the-Woods, Pest, Phantasm, Phelddagrif, Phoenix, Pig, Pikemen, Pincher, Pirate, Pixie-Queen, Plant, Poison-Snake, Poltergeist, Pony, Preacher, Priest, Prism, Pyknite, Rabbit, Raider, Ranger, Rat, Rebel, Reflection, Rhino, Robber, Roc, Rock-Sled, Rogue, Sage, Salamander, Samurai, Sand, Saproling, Satyr, Scavenger, Scorpion, Scout, Serf, Serpent, Shade, Shaman, Shapeshifter, Shark, Sheep, Ship, Shyft, Sindbad, Singing-Tree, Sister, Skeleton, Slith, Sliver, Slug, Smith, Snake, Soldier, Sorceress, Spawn, Speaker, Specter, Spellshaper, Sphinx, Spider, Spike, Spirit, Sponge, Sprite, Spuzzem, Spy, Squire, Squirrel, Stangg-Twin, Starfish, Strider, Survivor, Swarm, Tactician, Tarpan, Taskmaster, Teddy, Tetravite, Thief, The-Biggest-Baddest-Nastiest-Scariest-Creature-You'll-Ever-See, Thopter, Thrull, Thundermare, Tiger, Titan, Toad, Tortoise, Townsfolk, Tracker, Treefolk, Troll, Turtle, Twin, Uncle-Istvan, Undead, Unicorn, Vampire, Vedalken, Viashino, Villain, Viper, Volver, Vulture, Waiter, Walking-Dead, Wall, War-Rider, Warrior, Wasp, Weird, Whale, Whippoorwill, Wight, Wiitigo, Wirefly, Witch, Wizard, Wolf, Wolverine, Wolverine-Pack, Wolves-of-the-Hunt, Wombat, Worm, Wraith, Wretched, Wurm, Yeti, Zombie, Zubera

Creature Type

Creature subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Creature — Human Soldier," "Artifact Creature — Golem," and so on. Creature subtypes are also called creature types. Creatures may have multiple subtypes. The list of creature types, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: Abomination, Aboroth, Advisor, Aladdin, Albatross, Alchemist, Ali-Baba, Ali-from-Cairo, Alligator, Ambush-Party, Angel, Ant, Antelope, Ape, Archaeologist, Archer, Archon, Artificer, Asp, Assassin, Assembly-Worker, Atog, Aurochs, Avatar, Avenger, Avizoa, Badger, Ball-Lightning, Bandit, Banshee, Barbarian, Barishi, Basilisk, Bat, Bear, Beast, Bee, Beeble, Being, Berserker, Bird, Blinkmoth, Boar, Bodyguard, Bringer, Brother, Brownie, Brushwagg, Bull, Bureaucrat, Camarid, Camel, Caravan, Caribou, Carnivore, Carriage, Carrier, Cat, Cavalry, Cave-People, Centaur, Cephalid, Cheetah, Chicken, Child, Chimera, Citizen, Clamfolk, Cleric, Cobra, Cockatrice, Constable, Construct, Cow, Crab, Crocodile, Crusader, Cyclops, Dandan , Demon, Dervish, Deserter, Designer, Devil, Devouring-Deep, Dinosaur, Djinn, Dog, Donkey, Doppelganger, Dragon, Dragonfly, Drake, Dreadnought, Drill-Sergeant, Drone, Druid, Dryad, Dwarf, Eater, Eel, Effigy, Efreet, Egg, Elder, Elemental, Elephant, Elf, El-Hajjaj, Enchantress, Entity, Erne, Essence, Exorcist, Expansion-Symbol, Faerie, Fallen, Farmer, Ferret, Fiend, Fish, Flagbearer, Flying-Men, Fox, Frog, Frostbeast, Fungus, Fungusaur, Gaea's-Avenger, Gaea's-Liege, Gamer, Gargoyle, Gatekeeper, General, Ghost, Ghoul, Giant, Gnome, Goat, Goblin, Golem, Gorgon, Graveborn, Gremlin, Griffin, Guardian, Gus, Gypsy, Hag, Harlequin, Heretic, Hero, Hipparion, Hippo, Homarid, Hornet, Horror, Horse, Horseman, Hound, Human, Hunter, Hydra, Hyena, Illusion, Imp, Incarnation, Infernal-Denizen, Inquisitor, Insect, Island-Fish, Jackal, Jellyfish, Juggernaut, Kavu, Keeper, Kelp, King, Kirin, Kithkin, Knight, Kobold, Kraken, Lady-of-Proper-Etiquette, Lammasu, Leech, Legionnaire, Lemure, Leper, Leviathan, Lhurgoyf, Licid, Lizard, Lord, Lurker, Lycanthrope, Mage, Maiden, Mammoth, Manticore, Marid, Martyr, Master, Medusa, Mercenary, Merchant, Merfolk, Mime, Minion, Minor, Minotaur, Miracle-Worker, Mist, Mob, Mold-Demon, Monger, Mongoose, Monk, Monster, Moonfolk, Mosquito, Mummy, Murk-Dwellers, Mutant, Myr, Mystic, Nameless-Race, Narwhal, Nephilim, Niall-Silvain, Nightmare, Nightstalker, Ninja, Noble, Nomad, Octopus, Ogre, Ooze, Orb, Orc, Orgg, Ouphe, Ox, Oyster, Paladin, Paratrooper, Peacekeeper, Pegasus, Penguin, Pentavite, People-of-the-Woods, Pest, Phantasm, Phelddagrif, Phoenix, Pig, Pikemen, Pincher, Pirate, Pixie-Queen, Plant, Poison-Snake, Poltergeist, Pony, Preacher, Priest, Prism, Pyknite, Rabbit, Raider, Ranger, Rat, Rebel, Reflection, Rhino, Robber, Roc, Rock-Sled, Rogue, Sage, Salamander, Samurai, Sand, Saproling, Satyr, Scavenger, Scorpion, Scout, Serf, Serpent, Shade, Shaman, Shapeshifter, Shark, Sheep, Ship, Shyft, Sindbad, Singing-Tree, Sister, Skeleton, Slith, Sliver, Slug, Smith, Snake, Soldier, Sorceress, Spawn, Speaker, Specter, Spellshaper, Sphinx, Spider, Spike, Spirit, Sponge, Sprite, Spuzzem, Spy, Squire, Squirrel, Stangg-Twin, Starfish, Strider, Survivor, Swarm, Tactician, Tarpan, Taskmaster, Teddy, Tetravite, Thief, The-Biggest-Baddest-Nastiest-Scariest-Creature-You'll-Ever-See, Thopter, Thrull, Thundermare, Tiger, Titan, Toad, Tortoise, Townsfolk, Tracker, Treefolk, Troll, Turtle, Twin, Uncle-Istvan, Undead, Unicorn, Vampire, Vedalken, Viashino, Villain, Viper, Volver, Vulture, Waiter, Walking-Dead, Wall, War-Rider, Warrior, Wasp, Weird, Whale, Whippoorwill, Wight, Wiitigo, Wirefly, Witch, Wizard, Wolf, Wolverine, Wolverine-Pack, Wolves-of-the-Hunt, Wombat, Worm, Wraith, Wretched, Wurm, Yeti, Zombie, Zubera

Cumulative Upkeep

Cumulative upkeep is a triggered ability that imposes an increasing cost on a permanent. "Cumulative upkeep [cost]" means "At the beginning of your upkeep, put an age counter on this permanent, then sacrifice this permanent unless you pay [cost] for each age counter on it." Note that if a permanent has more than one instance of cumulative upkeep, each creates a separate triggered ability at the beginning of upkeep that counts all the age counters on the permanent from both abilities. See rule 502.13, "Cumulative Upkeep."

Cumulative Upkeep

Cumulative upkeep is a triggered ability that imposes an increasing cost on a permanent. "Cumulative upkeep [cost]" means "At the beginning of your upkeep, put an age counter on this permanent, then sacrifice this permanent unless you pay [cost] for each age counter on it." If [cost] has choices associated with it, each choice is made separately for each age counter, then either the entire set of costs is paid, or none of them are paid. Partial payments aren't allowed. Note that if a permanent has more than one instance of cumulative upkeep, each creates a separate triggered ability at the beginning of upkeep that counts all the age counters on the permanent from all abilities. See rule 502.13, "Cumulative Upkeep."

Enchant Opponent, Enchant Player

Auras with the "enchant opponent" or "enchant player" ability can target and be attached to players. Such Auras can't target permanents and can't be attached to permanents. Rules 212.4d-i apply to an Aura with enchant player or enchant opponent in relation to players as they normally would for permanents. See also Aura, Enchant.

Enchant Opponent, Enchant Player

Auras with the "enchant opponent" or "enchant player" ability can target and be attached to players. Such Auras can't target permanents and can't be attached to permanents. Rules 212.4d-k apply to an Aura with enchant player or enchant opponent in relation to players as they normally would for permanents. See also Aura, Enchant.

Enchantment Type

Enchantment subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Enchantment — Shrine." Enchantment subtypes are also called enchantment types. The list of enchantment types, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: Aura, Shrine.

Enchantment Type

Enchantment subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Enchantment — Shrine." Enchantment subtypes are also called enchantment types. The list of enchantment types, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: Aura, Shrine.

Flip Cards

Flip cards, such as the "heroes" from the Champions of Kamigawa set, have a two-part card frame on a single card. The text that appears right side up on the card defines the card's normal characteristics. Additional alternative characteristics appear upside down on the card. The back of a flip card is the normal Magic: The Gathering card back. See rule 508, "Flip Cards." The top half of a flip card contains the card's normal name, text box, type line, power, and toughness. The text box usually contains an ability that causes the permanent to "flip" if certain conditions are met. The bottom half of a flip card contains an alternative name, text box, type line, power, and toughness. These characteristics are used only if the permanent is in play and only if the permanent is flipped. A flip card's color, mana cost, expansion symbol, illustration credit, and legal text don't change if the permanent is flipped. Also, any changes to it by external effects will still apply. In every zone other than the in-play zone, and also in the in-play zone before the permanent flips, a flip card has only the normal characteristics of the permanent. Once the flip permanent in the in-play zone is flipped, the normal name, text box, type line, power, and toughness of the flip permanent don't apply and the alternative versions of those characteristics apply instead. If you control a flip permanent, you must ensure that it's clear at all times whether the permanent is flipped or not, both when it's untapped and when it's tapped. Common methods for distinguishing between flipped and unflipped permanents include using coins or dice to mark flipped objects. Flipping a permanent is a one-way process. Once a permanent is flipped, it's impossible for it to become unflipped. However, if flipped permanent leaves play, it retains no memory of its status.

Flip Cards

Flip cards, such as the "heroes" from the Champions of Kamigawa (tm) set, have a two-part card frame on a single card. The text that appears right side up on the card defines the card's normal characteristics. Additional alternative characteristics appear upside down on the card. The back of a flip card is the normal Magic: The Gathering card back. See rule 508, "Flip Cards." The top half of a flip card contains the card's normal name, text box, type line, power, and toughness. The text box usually contains an ability that causes the permanent to "flip" if certain conditions are met. The bottom half of a flip card contains an alternative name, text box, type line, power, and toughness. These characteristics are used only if the permanent is in play and only if the permanent is flipped. A flip card's color, mana cost, expansion symbol, illustration credit, and legal text don't change if the permanent is flipped. Also, any changes to it by external effects will still apply. In every zone other than the in-play zone, and also in the in-play zone before the permanent flips, a flip card has only the normal characteristics of the permanent. Once the flip permanent in the in-play zone is flipped, the normal name, text box, type line, power, and toughness of the flip permanent don't apply and the alternative versions of those characteristics apply instead. If you control a flip permanent, you must ensure that it's clear at all times whether the permanent is flipped or not, both when it's untapped and when it's tapped. Common methods for distinguishing between flipped and unflipped permanents include using coins or dice to mark flipped objects. Flipping a permanent is a one-way process. Once a permanent is flipped, it's impossible for it to become unflipped. However, if flipped permanent leaves play, it retains no memory of its status.

Flip a Coin

To flip a coin, one player flips the coin, and one of that player's opponents calls "heads" or "tails" in the air. If the coin you're using doesn't have an obvious "heads" or "tails," designate one side to be "heads," and the other side to be "tails." Rolling a die is an acceptable alternative if no coin is available.

Flip a Coin

To flip a coin for an object that cares whether a player wins or loses the flip, the affected player flips the coin and calls "heads" or "tails" while the coin is in the air. If the call matches the result, that player wins the flip. Otherwise, the player loses the flip. Only the player who flips the coin wins or loses the flip; no other players are involved. To flip a coin for an object that cares whether the coin comes up heads or tails, each affected player flips a coin without making a call. No player wins or loses this kind of flip. If the coin that's being flipped doesn't have an obvious "heads" or "tails," designate one side to be "heads," and the other side to be "tails." Other methods of randomization may be substituted for flipping a coin as long as there are two possible outcomes of equal likelihood and all players agree to the substitution.

Global Enchantment (Obsolete)

Some older cards used the term "global enchantment." These cards now say "non-Aura enchantment." See also Aura and Enchantment.

Global Enchantment (obsolete)

Some older cards used the term "global enchantment." These cards now say "non-Aura enchantment." See also Aura and Enchantment.

Instant Type

Instant subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Instant — Arcane." Instant subtypes are also called instant types. An instant subtype that's also a sorcery subtype is also called a spell type. The list of instant types, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: Arcane.

Instant Type

Instant subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Instant — Arcane." Instant subtypes are also called instant types. An instant subtype that's also a sorcery subtype is also called a spell type. The list of instant types, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: Arcane.

Land Type

Land subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Land — Locus, Land — Urza's Mine," etc. Land subtypes are also called land types. Lands may have multiple subtypes. Note that "basic," "legendary," and "nonbasic" aren't land types. See rule 212.6, "Lands." See also Basic Land Type. The list of land types, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: Desert, Forest, Island, Lair, Locus, Mine, Mountain, Plains, Power-Plant, Swamp, Tower, Urza's

Land Type

Land subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Land — Locus, Land — Urza's Mine," etc. Land subtypes are also called land types. Lands may have multiple subtypes. Note that "basic," "legendary," and "nonbasic" aren't land types. See rule 212.6, "Lands." See also Basic Land Type. The list of land types, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: Desert, Forest, Island, Lair, Locus, Mine, Mountain, Plains, Power-Plant, Swamp, Tower, Urza's

Local Enchantment (Obsolete)

Some older cards used the term "local enchantment" for enchantments that are attached to other permanents while they're in play. These cards now have the Aura subtype.

Local Enchantment (obsolete)

Some older cards used the term "local enchantment" for enchantments that are attached to other permanents while they're in play. These cards now have the Aura subtype.

Mana Symbol

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, {X}, {Y}, {Z} and the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on, and the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}. See rule 104.3. Each of the colored mana symbols represents one colored mana: {W} white, {U} blue, {B} black, {R} red, and {G} green. See rule 104.3a. Numeral symbols (such as {1}) are generic mana costs and represent an amount of mana that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. See rule 104.3b. The symbols {X}, {Y} and {Z} represent unspecified amounts of mana; when playing a spell or activated ability with {X}, {Y}, or {Z} in its cost, its controller decides the value of that variable. See rule 104.3c. Numeral symbols and variable symbols can also represent colorless mana if they appear in the effect of a spell or of a mana ability that reads "add [mana symbol] to your mana pool" or something similar. See rule 104.3d. The symbol {0} represents zero mana and is used as a placeholder when a spell or activated ability costs nothing to play. A spell or ability whose cost is {0} must still be played the same way as one with a cost greater than zero; it won't play itself automatically. See rule 104.3e. Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost which can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. See rule 104.3f.

Mana Symbol

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}; {X}, {Y}, {Z}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; and the snow symbol {S}. See rule 104.3. Each of the colored mana symbols represents one colored mana: {W} white, {U} blue, {B} black, {R} red, and {G} green. See rule 104.3a. Numeral symbols (such as {1}) are generic mana costs and represent an amount of mana that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. See rule 104.3b. The symbols {X}, {Y} and {Z} represent unspecified amounts of mana; when playing a spell or activated ability with {X}, {Y}, or {Z} in its cost, its controller decides the value of that variable. See rule 104.3c. Numeral symbols and variable symbols can also represent colorless mana if they appear in the effect of a spell or of a mana ability that reads "add [mana symbol] to your mana pool" or something similar. See rule 104.3d. The symbol {0} represents zero mana and is used as a placeholder when a spell or activated ability costs nothing to play. A spell or ability whose cost is {0} must still be played the same way as one with a cost greater than zero; it won't play itself automatically. See rule 104.3e. Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost which can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. See rule 104.3f. The symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. See rule 104.3h.

Modal, Mode

A spell or ability is modal if it is written "Choose one -" or "[a specified player] chooses one -." Modal spells and abilities offer a choice of effects. A modal spell or ability's controller must choose the mode as part of playing the spell or ability or as part of putting the ability on the stack (in the case of triggered abilities). See rule 409.1b.

Modal, Mode

A spell or ability is modal if it is written "choose one -" or "[a specified player] chooses one -." Modal spells and abilities offer a choice of effects. A modal spell or ability's controller must choose the mode as part of playing the spell or ability or as part of putting the ability on the stack (in the case of triggered abilities); see rule 409.1b. A modal replacement effect's mode is chosen as it's applied; see rule 419.6g.

Move

To move a counter means to take it from where it currently is and put it onto an object or player. Some older cards used "move" to describe taking an Aura on one permanent and putting it onto another. These cards now say "attach."

Move

To move a counter means to take it from where it currently is and put it onto another object. If the object the counter would move from has no counters, or either that object or any possible objects the counter would move onto are no longer in the correct zone when the effect would move the counter, nothing happens. Some older cards used "move" to describe taking an Aura on one permanent and putting it onto another. These cards now say "attach."

Snow

Snow is a supertype. When a card refers to a "snow permanent," it means a permanent with the snow supertype. When a card refers to a "snow Forest," it means a Forest with the snow supertype, and so on. Some older cards were printed with the term "snow-covered" in their rules text. Except for card names, all instances of "snow-covered" are now "snow." See rule 205.4e.

Snow Landwalk

Snow landwalk is a special form of landwalk. A creature with snow landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one snow land of the specified subtype. See rule 502.6, "Landwalk," and rule 205.4e.

Snow Mana

The snow mana symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. This is a generic mana cost that can be paid with any color or, or colorless, mana. Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don't affect {S} costs.

Snow-Covered

Snow-covered is a supertype. When a card refers to a "snow-covered land," it means a land with the snow-covered supertype. When a card refers to a "snow-covered Forest," it means a Forest with the snow-covered supertype, and so on. See rule 205.4e.

Snow-Covered (Obsolete)

Some older cards were printed with the term "snow-covered" in their rules text. Except for card names, all instances of "snow-covered" are now "snow."

Snow-Covered Landwalk

Snow-covered landwalk is a special form of landwalk. A creature with snow-covered landwalk is unblockable as long as the defending player controls at least one snow-covered land of the specified subtype. See rule 502.6, "Landwalk," and rule 205.4e.

Sorcery Type

Sorcery subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Sorcery — Arcane." Sorcery subtypes are also called sorcery types. A sorcery subtype that's also an instant subtype is also called a spell type. The list of sorcery types, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: Arcane.

Sorcery Type

Sorcery subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Sorcery — Arcane." Sorcery subtypes are also called sorcery types. A sorcery subtype that's also an instant subtype is also called a spell type. The list of sorcery types, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: Arcane.

Split Cards

Split cards have two card faces on a single card. The back of a split card is the normal, full-size Magic card back. Split cards have two sets of characteristics: two names, two mana costs, and so on. They always have both sets, except when they're spells on the stack. When you play a split card, you announce which side you're playing. While it's on the stack, the other side is ignored completely. See rule 505, "Split Cards." Split cards have two mana costs with different colors of mana in them. That means they are multicolored cards while they're not on the stack. A split card is a multicolored card on the stack only if the half that's been played is multicolored. If an effect tells you to name a card, you must name all of a split card's names. Effects that ask for a split card's characteristic get both answers. Effects that ask if a split card's characteristic matches a given value get only one answer. This answer is "yes" if either side of the split card matches the given value.

Split Cards

Split cards have two card faces on a single card. The back of a split card is the normal, full-size Magic card back. Split cards have two sets of characteristics: two names, two mana costs, and so on. They always have both sets, except when they're spells on the stack. When you play a split card, you announce which side you're playing. While it's on the stack, the other side is ignored completely. See rule 505, "Split Cards." Split cards have two mana costs with different colors of mana in them. That means they are multicolored cards while they're not on the stack. A split card is a multicolored card on the stack only if the half that's been played is multicolored. If an effect tells you to name a card, you must name all of a split card's names. An effect that asks for a split card's characteristic while it's in a zone other than the stack gets both answers. An effect that performs a positive comparison or a relative comparison involving characteristics of one or more split cards in any zone other than the stack gets only one answer. This answer is "yes" if either side of those split cards would return a "yes" answer if compared individually. An effect that performs a negative comparison involving characteristics of one or more split cards in any zone other than the stack also gets only one answer. This answer is "yes" if performing the comparable positive comparison would return a "no" answer.

Supertype

A card can have one or more "supertypes." These are printed directly before the card's types. If an object's types or subtypes change, any supertypes it has are kept, although they may not be relevant to the new type. See rule 205.4, "Supertypes." An object's supertype is independent of its type and subtype. Changing an object's type or subtype won't change its supertype. Changing an object's supertype won't change its type or subtype. When an object gains or loses a supertype, it retains any other supertypes it had. See rule 212. "Type, Supertype, and Subtype." The list of supertypes, updated through the Dissension set, is as follows: basic, legendary, snow-covered, and world.

Supertype

A card can have one or more "supertypes." These are printed directly before the card's types. If an object's types or subtypes change, any supertypes it has are kept, although they may not be relevant to the new type. See rule 205.4, "Supertypes." An object's supertype is independent of its type and subtype. Changing an object's type or subtype won't change its supertype. Changing an object's supertype won't change its type or subtype. When an object gains or loses a supertype, it retains any other supertypes it had. See rule 212. "Type, Supertype, and Subtype." The list of supertypes, updated through the Coldsnap set, is as follows: basic, legendary, snow, and world.

You, Your

The words "you" and "your" on an object refer to the object's controller (or its owner if it has no controller). For a static ability, this is the current controller of the object it's on. For an activated ability, this is the player who played the ability. For a triggered ability, this is the controller of the object when the ability triggered. See also Controller, Owner.

You, Your

The words "you" and "your" on an object refer to the object's controller, its would-be controller (if a player is attempting to play it), or its owner (if it has no controller). For a static ability, this is the current controller of the object it's on. For an activated ability, this is the player who played the ability. For a triggered ability, this is the controller of the object when the ability triggered. See also Controller, Owner.