Yawgatog.com

Resources

Magic: The Gathering Comprehensive Rules Changes

Morningtide to Shadowmoor

General changes

Old rule (Morningtide) New rule (Shadowmoor)

104.1b.

Most of the time, the Magic game uses only positive numbers. You can't choose a negative number, deal negative damage, gain negative life, and so on. However, it's possible for a game value, such as a creature's power, to be less than zero. If a calculation or comparison that would determine the result of an effect needs to use a negative value, it does so. If such a calculation yields a negative number, zero is used instead, unless that effect sets a creature's power or toughness, changes a creature's power or toughness, or sets a player's life total.

Example: If a 3/4 creature gets -5/-0, it's a -2/4 creature. It deals no damage in combat. Its total power and toughness is 2. You'd have to give it +3/+0 to raise its power to 1.

Example: Viridian Joiner is a 1/2 creature that says "{T}: Add an amount of {G} to your mana pool equal to Viridian Joiner's power." An effect gives it -2/-0, then its ability is activated. The ability adds no mana to your mana pool.

104.1b.

Most of the time, the Magic game uses only positive numbers. You can't choose a negative number, deal negative damage, gain negative life, and so on. However, it's possible for a game value, such as a creature's power, to be less than zero. If a calculation or comparison that would determine the result of an effect needs to use a negative value, it does so. If such a calculation yields a negative number, zero is used instead, unless that effect sets a player's life total to a specific value, sets a creature's power or toughness to a specific value, or otherwise modifies a creature's power or toughness.

Example: If a 3/4 creature gets -5/-0, it's a -2/4 creature. It deals no damage in combat. Its total power and toughness is 2. You'd have to give it +3/+0 to raise its power to 1.

Example: Viridian Joiner is a 1/2 creature that says "{T}: Add an amount of {G} to your mana pool equal to Viridian Joiner's power." An effect gives it -2/-0, then its ability is activated. The ability adds no mana to your mana pool.

104.3.

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {X}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; and the snow symbol {S}.

104.3.

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {X}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; the monocolored hybrid symbols {2/W}, {2/U}, {2/B}, {2/R}, and {2/G}; and the snow symbol {S}.

104.3f.

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. A hybrid mana symbol is each of its component colors.

Example: {G/W}{G/W} can be paid by spending {G}{G}, {G}{W}, or {W}{W}.

104.3f.

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid in one of two ways, as represented by the two halves of the hybrid mana symbol. A hybrid symbol such as {W/U} be paid with either white or blue mana, and a monocolored hybrid symbol such as {2/B} can be paid with either one black mana or two mana of any color of, or colorless, mana. A hybrid mana symbol is all of its component colors.

Example: {G/W}{G/W} can be paid by spending {G}{G}, {G}{W}, or {W}{W}.

104.3g.

If an effect would add one mana represented by a hybrid mana symbol to a player's mana pool, that player chooses either of that symbol's colors and adds one mana of that color to his or her mana pool.

104.3g.

If an effect would add mana represented by a hybrid mana symbol to a player's mana pool, that player chooses one half of that symbol. If a colored half is chosen, one mana of that color is added to that player's mana pool. If a colorless half is chosen, an amount of colorless mana represented by that half's number is added to that player's mana pool.

104.3h.

If a cost would be reduced by an amount of mana represented by a hybrid mana symbol, the player paying that cost chooses one half of that symbol at the time the cost reduction is applied (see rule 409.1f). If a colored half is chosen, the cost is reduced by one mana of that color (or, if the cost can't be reduced by one mana of that color, the cost is reduced by one generic mana). If a colorless half is chosen, the cost is reduced by an amount of generic mana equal to that half's number.

104.3h.

The snow mana symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. This is a generic mana cost that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don't affect {S} costs.

104.3i.

The snow mana symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. This is a generic mana cost that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don't affect {S} costs.

104.5.

The untap symbol is {Q}. The untap symbol in an activation cost means "Untap this permanent." A permanent that's already untapped can't be untapped again to pay the cost. Creatures that haven't been under a player's control continuously since the beginning of his or her most recent turn can't use any ability with the untap symbol in the cost. See rule 212.3f.

104.5.

A tombstone icon appears to the left of the name of many Odyssey (tm) block cards with abilities that are relevant in a player's graveyard. The purpose of the icon is to make those cards stand out when they're in a graveyard. This icon has no effect on game play.

104.6.

A tombstone icon appears to the left of the name of many Odyssey (tm) block cards with abilities that are relevant in a player's graveyard. The purpose of the icon is to make those cards stand out when they're in a graveyard. This icon has no effect on game play.

104.6.

A type icon appears in the upper left corner of each card from the Future Sight (tm) set printed with an alternate "timeshifted" frame. If the card has a single card type, this icon indicates what it is: claw marks for creature, a flame for sorcery, a lightning bolt for instant, a sunrise for enchantment, a chalice for artifact, and a pair of mountain peaks for land. If the card has multiple card types, that's indicated by a black and white cross. This icon has no effect on game play.

104.7.

A type icon appears in the upper left corner of each card from the Future Sight (tm) set printed with an alternate "timeshifted" frame. If the card has a single card type, this icon indicates what it is: claw marks for creature, a flame for sorcery, a lightning bolt for instant, a sunrise for enchantment, a chalice for artifact, and a pair of mountain peaks for land. If the card has multiple card types, that's indicated by a black and white cross. This icon has no effect on game play.

104.7.

Each activated ability of a planeswalker has an arrow-shaped loyalty symbol in its cost. Positive loyalty symbols point upward and feature a plus sign followed by a number or an X. Negative loyalty symbols point downward and feature a minus sign followed by a number or an X. [+N] means "Put N loyalty counters on this permanent," and [-N] means "Remove N loyalty counters from this permanent."

104.8.

Each activated ability of a planeswalker has an arrow-shaped loyalty symbol in its cost. Positive loyalty symbols point upward and feature a plus sign followed by a number or an X. Negative loyalty symbols point downward and feature a minus sign followed by a number or an X. [+N] means "Put N loyalty counters on this permanent," and [-N] means "Remove N loyalty counters from this permanent."

203.2e.

An object with one or more hybrid mana symbols in its mana cost is each of the colors of that mana symbol, in addition to any other colors the object might be. Most cards with hybrid mana symbols in their mana costs are printed in a two-tone frame. See rule 104.3f.

203.2e.

An object with one or more hybrid mana symbols in its mana cost is all of the colors of those mana symbols, in addition to any other colors the object might be. Most cards with hybrid mana symbols in their mana costs are printed in a two-tone frame. See rule 104.3f.

203.3c.

When calculating the converted mana cost of an object with a hybrid mana symbol in its mana cost, use the largest component of each hybrid symbol.

Example: The converted mana cost of a card with mana cost {1}{W/U}{W/U} is 3.

Example: The converted mana cost of a card with mana cost {2/B}{2/B}{2/B} is 6.

208.2.

Some creature cards have power and/or toughness represented by a * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its power and/or toughness according to some stated condition. This ability functions in all zones. If the ability needs to use a number that can't be determined, use 0 instead of that number.

Example: Lost Order of Jarkeld has power and toughness each equal to 1+*. It says "As Lost Order of Jarkeld comes into play, choose an opponent" and "Lost Order of Jarkeld's power and toughness are each equal to 1 plus the number of creatures that opponent controls." While Lost Order of Jarkeld isn't in play, there won't be a chosen opponent. Its power and toughness will each be equal to 1 plus 0, so it's a 1/1.

208.2.

Some creature cards have power and/or toughness represented by a * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its power and/or toughness according to some stated condition. This ability functions everywhere, even outside the game. If the ability needs to use a number that can't be determined, use 0 instead of that number.

Example: Lost Order of Jarkeld has power and toughness each equal to 1+*. It says "As Lost Order of Jarkeld comes into play, choose an opponent" and "Lost Order of Jarkeld's power and toughness are each equal to 1 plus the number of creatures that opponent controls." While Lost Order of Jarkeld isn't in play, there won't be a chosen opponent. Its power and toughness will each be equal to 1 plus 0, so it's a 1/1.

212.3f.

A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol in its activation cost can't be played unless the creature has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. A creature can't attack unless it has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. This rule is informally called the "summoning sickness" rule. Ignore this rule for creatures with haste (see rule 502.5).

212.3f.

A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can't be played unless the creature has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. A creature can't attack unless it has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. This rule is informally called the "summoning sickness" rule. Ignore this rule for creatures with haste (see rule 502.5).

212.3g.

Damage dealt to a creature stays on that creature. If the total accumulated damage on that creature is equal to or greater than its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed as a state-based effect (see rule 420.5c). All damage on a creature is removed when it regenerates (see rule 501.5, "Regenerate") and during the cleanup step (see rule 314.2).

212.3g.

Creature lands combine the characteristics of both lands and creatures, and are subject to spells and abilities that affect either or both card types. Creature lands can only be played as lands. They can't be played as spells.

212.3h.

Creature lands combine the characteristics of both lands and creatures, and are subject to spells and abilities that affect either or both card types. Creature lands can only be played as lands. They can't be played as spells.

215.4a.

If a cost or effect allows a player to pay life in a Two-Headed Giant game, the player may do so only if his or her team's life total is equal to or greater than the amount of the payment. If a player pays life, the payment is subtracted from his or her team's life total.

215.7.

If an effect says that a player can't gain life, that player can't exchange life totals with a player who has a higher life total; in that case, the exchange won't happen. In addition, a cost that involves having that player gain life can't be paid, and a replacement effect that would replace a life gain event affecting that player won't do anything.

216.1.

Some effects put tokens into play. A token is controlled by whomever put it into play and owned by the controller of the spell or ability that created it. (If no player controlled the effect that created it, the token is owned by whomever put it into play.) The spell or ability may define any number of characteristics for the token. This becomes the token's "text." The characteristics defined this way are functionally equivalent to the characteristics that are printed on a card; for example, they define the token's copiable values. A token doesn't have any characteristics not defined by the spell or ability that created it.

216.1.

Some effects put tokens into play. A token is controlled by whoever put it into play and owned by the controller of the spell or ability that created it. (If no player controlled the effect that created it, the token is owned by whoever put it into play.) The spell or ability may define any number of characteristics for the token. This becomes the token's "text." The characteristics defined this way are functionally equivalent to the characteristics that are printed on a card; for example, they define the token's copiable values. A token doesn't have any characteristics not defined by the spell or ability that created it.

402.8a.

Characteristic-defining abilities function in all zones. (See rule 405.2.)

402.8a.

Characteristic-defining abilities function everywhere, even outside the game. (See rule 405.2.)

403.4.

A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol ({T}) in its activation cost can't be played unless the creature has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. Ignore this rule for creatures with haste (see rule 502.5).

403.4.

A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol ({T}) or the untap symbol ({Q}) in its activation cost can't be played unless the creature has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. Ignore this rule for creatures with haste (see rule 502.5).

405.2.

A characteristic-defining ability is a kind of static ability. It conveys information about an object's characteristics that would normally be found elsewhere on that object (such as in its mana cost, type line, or power/toughness box). Characteristic-defining abilities function in all zones.

405.2.

A characteristic-defining ability is a kind of static ability. It conveys information about an object's characteristics that would normally be found elsewhere on that object (such as in its mana cost, type line, or power/toughness box). Characteristic-defining abilities function in all zones. They also function outside the game.

409.1b.

If the spell or ability is modal (uses the phrase "Choose one -," "Choose two -,"or "[specified player] chooses one -"), the player announces the mode choice. If the player wishes to splice any cards onto the spell (see rule 502.40), he or she reveals those cards in his or her hand. If the spell or ability has a variable mana cost (indicated by {X}) or some other variable cost, the player announces the value of that variable at this time. If the spell or ability has alternative, additional, or other special costs (such as buyback, kicker, or convoke costs), the player announces his or her intentions to pay any or all of those costs (see rule 409.1f). You can't apply two alternative methods of playing or two alternative costs to a single spell or ability. Previously made choices (such as choosing to play a spell with flashback from his or her graveyard or choosing to play a creature with morph face down) may restrict the player's options when making these choices.

409.1b.

If the spell or ability is modal (uses the phrase "Choose one -," "Choose two -,"or "[specified player] chooses one -"), the player announces the mode choice. If the player wishes to splice any cards onto the spell (see rule 502.40), he or she reveals those cards in his or her hand. If the spell or ability has a variable mana cost (indicated by {X}) or some other variable cost, the player announces the value of that variable at this time. If the spell or ability has alternative, additional, or other special costs (such as buyback, kicker, or convoke costs), the player announces his or her intentions to pay any or all of those costs (see rule 409.1f). You can't apply two alternative methods of playing or two alternative costs to a single spell or ability. If a cost includes hybrid mana symbols in its cost, the player announces the nonhybrid equivalent cost he or she intends to pay. Previously made choices (such as choosing to play a spell with flashback from his or her graveyard or choosing to play a creature with morph face down) may restrict the player's options when making these choices.

409.1c.

If the spell or ability requires any targets, the player first announces how many targets he or she will choose (if the spell or ability has a variable number of targets), then announces the targets themselves. A player can't play a spell or ability unless he or she chooses the required number of legal targets. The same target can't be chosen multiple times for any one instance of the word "target" on the spell or ability. If the spell or ability uses the word "target" in multiple places, the same object, player, or zone can be chosen once for each instance of the word "target" (as long as it fits the targeting criteria).

Example: If an ability reads "Tap two target creatures," then the same target can't be chosen twice; the ability requires two different legal targets. An ability that reads "Destroy target artifact and target land," however, can target the same artifact land twice because it uses the word "target" in multiple places.

409.1c.

If the spell or ability requires any targets, the player first announces how many targets he or she will choose (if the spell or ability has a variable number of targets), then announces his or her choice of an appropriate player, object, or zone for each of those targets. A player can't play a spell or ability unless he or she chooses the required number of legal targets. The same target can't be chosen multiple times for any one instance of the word "target" on the spell or ability. If the spell or ability uses the word "target" in multiple places, the same object, player, or zone can be chosen once for each instance of the word "target" (as long as it fits the targeting criteria).

Example: If an ability reads "Tap two target creatures," then the same target can't be chosen twice; the ability requires two different legal targets. An ability that reads "Destroy target artifact and target land," however, can target the same artifact land twice because it uses the word "target" in multiple places.

409.1e.

If the spell or ability affects several targets in different ways, the player announces how it will affect each target. If the spell or ability requires the player to divide or distribute an effect (such as damage or counters) among one or more targets, or any number of untargeted objects or players, the player announces the division. Each of these targets, objects, or players must receive at least one of whatever is being divided.

409.1e.

If the spell or ability requires the player to divide or distribute an effect (such as damage or counters) among one or more targets, or any number of untargeted objects or players, the player announces the division. Each of these targets, objects, or players must receive at least one of whatever is being divided.

409.1f.

The player determines the total cost of the spell or ability. Usually this is just the mana cost (for spells) or activation cost (for abilities). Some cards list additional or alternative costs in their text. Some effects may increase or reduce the cost to pay, or may provide other alternative costs. Costs may include paying mana, tapping permanents, sacrificing permanents, discarding cards, and so on. The total cost is the mana cost, activation cost, or alternative cost, plus all additional costs and cost increases, and minus all cost reductions. If the mana component of the total cost is reduced to nothing by cost reduction effects, it is considered to be {0}. It can't be reduced to less than {0}. Once the total cost is determined, it becomes "locked in." If effects would change the total cost after this time, they have no effect.

409.1f.

The player determines the total cost of the spell or ability. Usually this is just the mana cost (for spells) or activation cost (for abilities). Some cards list additional or alternative costs in their text. Some effects may increase or reduce the cost to pay, or may provide other alternative costs. Costs may include paying mana, tapping permanents, sacrificing permanents, discarding cards, and so on. The total cost is the mana cost, activation cost, or alternative cost (as determined in rule 409.1b), plus all additional costs and cost increases, and minus all cost reductions. If the mana component of the total cost is reduced to nothing by cost reduction effects, it is considered to be {0}. It can't be reduced to less than {0}. Once the total cost is determined, it becomes "locked in." If effects would change the total cost after this time, they have no effect.

409.2.

Some spells and abilities specify that one of their controller's opponents does something the controller would normally do while it's being played, such as choose a mode, choose targets, or choose how the spell or ability will affect its targets. In these cases, the opponent does so when the spell or ability's controller normally would do so.

409.2.

Some spells and abilities specify that one of their controller's opponents does something the controller would normally do while it's being played, such as choose a mode or choose targets. In these cases, the opponent does so when the spell or ability's controller normally would do so.

410.10d.

Normally, objects that exist immediately after an event are checked to see if the event matched any trigger conditions. Continuous effects that exist at that time are used to determine what the trigger conditions are and what the objects involved in the event look like. However, some triggered abilities must be treated specially because the object with the ability may no longer be in play, may have moved to a hand or library, or may no longer be controlled by the appropriate player. The game has to "look back in time" to determine if these abilities trigger. Abilities that trigger specifically when an object leaves play, when an object is put into a hand or library, or when a player loses control of an object will trigger based on their existence, and the appearance of objects, prior to the event rather than afterward.

Example: Two creatures are in play along with an artifact that has the ability "Whenever a creature is put into a graveyard from play, you gain 1 life." Someone plays a spell that destroys all artifacts, creatures, and enchantments. The artifact's ability triggers twice, even though the artifact goes to its owner's graveyard at the same time as the creatures.

410.10d.

Normally, objects that exist immediately after an event are checked to see if the event matched any trigger conditions. Continuous effects that exist at that time are used to determine what the trigger conditions are and what the objects involved in the event look like. However, some triggered abilities must be treated specially because the object with the ability may no longer be in play, may have moved to a hand or library, or may no longer be controlled by the appropriate player. The game has to "look back in time" to determine if these abilities trigger. Abilities that trigger specifically when an object leaves play, when an object is put into a hand or library from a public zone, or when a player loses control of an object will trigger based on their existence, and the appearance of objects, prior to the event rather than afterward.

Example: Two creatures are in play along with an artifact that has the ability "Whenever a creature is put into a graveyard from play, you gain 1 life." Someone plays a spell that destroys all artifacts, creatures, and enchantments. The artifact's ability triggers twice, even though the artifact goes to its owner's graveyard at the same time as the creatures.

419.7e.

Some prevention effects also include a replacement effect that refers to what was prevented. The prevention happens at the time the original event would have happened; the replacement happens immediately afterward.

423.3.

If there are no cards in a player's library and an effect offers that player the choice to draw a card, that player may choose to do so.

423.3.

If there are no cards in a player's library and an effect offers that player the choice to draw a card, that player can choose to do so. However, if an effect says that a player can't draw cards and another effect offers that player the choice to draw a card, that player can't choose to do so.

423.7.

Some replacement effects result in multiple card draws. In such a case, any parts of the original event that haven't been replaced by the effect occur first, then the card draws happen one at a time.

502.5b.

A creature with haste can attack or use activated abilities whose cost includes the tap symbol even if it hasn't been controlled by its controller continuously since the start of his or her most recent turn. (See rule 212.3f.)

502.5b.

A creature with haste can attack or use activated abilities whose cost includes the tap symbol or the untap symbol even if it hasn't been controlled by its controller continuously since the start of his or her most recent turn. (See rule 212.3f.)

502.73a.

Changeling is a characteristic-defining ability. "Changeling" means "This object is every creature type." This ability works in all zones. See rule 405.2.

502.73a.

Changeling is a characteristic-defining ability. "Changeling" means "This object is every creature type." This ability works everywhere, even outside the game. See rule 405.2.

502.78.

Conspire

502.78a.

Conspire is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. The second is a triggered ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Conspire" means "As an additional cost to play this spell, you may tap two untapped creatures you control that each share a color with it" and "When you play this spell, if its conspire cost was paid, copy it. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for the copy." Paying a spell's conspire cost follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h.

502.78b.

If a spell has multiple instances of conspire, each is paid separately and triggers based on its own payment, not any other instance of conspire.

502.79.

Persist

502.79a.

Persist is a triggered ability. "Persist" means "When this permanent is put into a graveyard from play, if it had no -1/-1 counters on it, return it to play under its owner's control with a -1/-1 counter on it."

502.80.

Wither

502.80a.

Damage dealt to a creature by a source with wither doesn't stay on that creature (see rule 212.3g). Rather, it causes that many -1/-1 counters to be put on that creature.

502.80b.

Multiple instances of wither on the same object are redundant.

600.4b.

If an object would change to the control of a player who has left the game, that object's control remains unchanged. If a token would be put into play under the control of a player who has left the game, no token is created.

600.4b.

If an object would change to the control of a player who has left the game, it doesn't. If a token would be put into play under the control of a player who has left the game, no token is created.

600.4c.

If an object owned by a player who has left the game would be put into any zone, it leaves the game instead. (This includes abilities that would be put onto the stack.)

Example: Astral Slide is an enchantment that reads, "Whenever a player cycles a card, you may remove target creature from the game. If you do, return that creature to play under its owner's control at end of turn." During Alex's turn, Bianca uses Astral Slide's ability to remove Alex's Hypnotic Specter from the game. Before the end of that turn, Bianca leaves the game. At end of turn, the delayed triggered ability generated by Astral Slide that would return Hypnotic Specter to play triggers, but it leaves the game rather than being put on the stack. Hypnotic Specter never returns to play.

600.4c.

If an object that would be owned by a player who has left the game would be created in any zone, it isn't created. If a triggered ability that would be controlled by a player who has left the game would be put onto the stack, it isn't put on the stack.

Example: Astral Slide is an enchantment that reads, "Whenever a player cycles a card, you may remove target creature from the game. If you do, return that creature to play under its owner's control at end of turn." During Alex's turn, Bianca uses Astral Slide's ability to remove Alex's Hypnotic Specter from the game. Before the end of that turn, Bianca leaves the game. At end of turn, the delayed triggered ability generated by Astral Slide that would return Hypnotic Specter to play triggers, but it isn't put on the stack. Hypnotic Specter never returns to play.

605.4.

Free-for-All games use the normal rules for winning and losing the game. See rule 102, "Winning and Losing."

605.4.

Free-for-All games use the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102), as modified by rule 601.15.

607.5.

The Emperor variant uses the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102), with the following addition.

607.5.

The Emperor variant uses the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102), as modified by rule 601.15, and with the following addition.

608.6.

The Grand Melee variant uses the normal rules for winning and losing the game.

608.6.

The Grand Melee variant uses the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102), as modified by rule 601.15.

609.5.

Team games use the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102).

609.5.

Team games use the normal rules for winning and losing the game (see rule 102), as modified by rule 601.15.

Ability Word

An ability word appears in italics at the beginning of some abilities on cards. Ability words are similar to keywords in that they tie together cards that have similar functionality, but they have no special rules meaning and no individual entries in the Comprehensive Rules.

Ability Word

An ability word appears in italics at the beginning of some abilities on cards. Ability words are similar to keywords in that they tie together cards that have similar functionality, but they have no special rules meaning and no individual entries in the Comprehensive Rules. The list of ability words, updated through the Shadowmoor (tm) set, is as follows: channel, grandeur, hellbent, kinship, radiance, sweep, and threshold.

Artifact Type

Artifact subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Artifact — Equipment." Artifact subtypes are also called artifact types. The list of artifact types, updated through the Morningtide (tm) set, is as follows: Contraption, Equipment, Fortification.

Artifact Type

Artifact subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Artifact — Equipment." Artifact subtypes are also called artifact types. The list of artifact types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Contraption, Equipment, Fortification.

Changeling

Changeling is a keyword ability that represents a characteristic-defining ability. "Changeling" means "This object is every creature type." This ability works in all zones. See rule 502.73, "Changeling."

Changeling

Changeling is a keyword ability that represents a characteristic-defining ability. "Changeling" means "This object is every creature type." This ability works in everywhere, even outside the game. See rule 502.73, "Changeling."

Characteristic-Defining Ability

A characteristic-defining ability is a kind of static ability that conveys information about an object's characteristics that would normally be found elsewhere on that object (such as in its mana cost, type line, or power/toughness box). Characteristic-defining abilities function in all zones. See rule 405.2.

Characteristic-Defining Ability

A characteristic-defining ability is a kind of static ability that conveys information about an object's characteristics that would normally be found elsewhere on that object (such as in its mana cost, type line, or power/toughness box). Characteristic-defining abilities function in all zones. They also function outside the game. See rule 405.2.

Color

The only colors in the Magic game are white, blue, black, red, and green. An object can be one or more of those colors or it can be colorless. "Colorless" isn't a color; neither are "artifact," "land," "brown," "gold," and so on. See rule 203.2. An object's color is determined by the color(s) of the mana symbols in its mana cost. A hybrid mana symbol is each of its component colors. Effects may change an object's color. If an effect gives an object a new color, the new color replaces all previous colors the object had.

Color

The only colors in the Magic game are white, blue, black, red, and green. An object can be one or more of those colors or it can be colorless. "Colorless" isn't a color; neither are "artifact," "land," "brown," "gold," and so on. See rule 203.2. An object's color is determined by the color(s) of the mana symbols in its mana cost. A hybrid mana symbol is all of its component colors. Effects may change an object's color. If an effect gives an object a new color, the new color replaces all previous colors the object had.

Conspire

Conspire is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. The second is a triggered ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Conspire" means "As an additional cost to play this spell, you may tap two untapped creatures you control that each share a color with it" and "When you play this spell, if its conspire cost was paid, copy it. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for the copy." Paying a spell's conspire cost follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h. See rule 502.78, "Conspire."

Converted Mana Cost

The converted mana cost of an object is the total amount of mana in its mana cost, regardless of color. If an object has no mana cost, its converted mana cost is 0. See rule 203, "Mana Cost and Color."

Example: An Air Elemental has a mana cost of {3}{U}{U} and a converted mana cost of 5.

Converted Mana Cost

The converted mana cost of an object is the total amount of mana in its mana cost, regardless of color. If an object has no mana cost, its converted mana cost is 0. When calculating the converted mana cost of an object with a hybrid mana symbol in its mana cost, use the largest component of each hybrid symbol. See rule 203, "Mana Cost and Color."

Example: An Air Elemental has a mana cost of {3}{U}{U} and a converted mana cost of 5.

Creature Type

Creatures and tribals share the same set of subtypes. These subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Creature — Human Soldier," "Artifact Creature — Golem," and so on. These subtypes are also called creature types. The list of creature types, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: Advisor, Angel, Anteater, Antelope, Ape, Archer, Archon, Artificer, Assassin, Assembly-Worker, Atog, Aurochs, Avatar, Badger, Barbarian, Basilisk, Bat, Bear, Beast, Beeble, Berserker, Bird, Blinkmoth, Boar, Bringer, Brushwagg, Camarid, Camel, Caribou, Carrier, Cat, Centaur, Cephalid, Chimera, Citizen, Cleric, Cockatrice, Construct, Coward, Crab, Crocodile, Cyclops, Dauthi, Demon, Deserter, Devil, Djinn, Dragon, Drake, Dreadnought, Drone, Druid, Dryad, Dwarf, Efreet, Egg, Elder, Elemental, Elephant, Elf, Elk, Eye, Faerie, Ferret, Fish, Flagbearer, Fox, Frog, Fungus, Gargoyle, Giant, Gnome, Goat, Goblin, Golem, Gorgon, Graveborn, Griffin, Hag, Harpy, Hellion, Hippo, Homarid, Homunculus, Horror, Horse, Hound, Human, Hydra, Hyena, Illusion, Imp, Incarnation, Insect, Jellyfish, Juggernaut, Kavu, Kirin, Kithkin, Knight, Kobold, Kor, Kraken, Lammasu, Leech, Leviathan, Lhurgoyf, Licid, Lizard, Manticore, Masticore, Mercenary, Merfolk, Metathran, Minion, Minotaur, Monger, Mongoose, Monk, Moonfolk, Mutant, Myr, Mystic, Nautilus, Nephilim, Nightmare, Nightstalker, Ninja, Nomad, Octopus, Ogre, Ooze, Orb, Orc, Orgg, Ouphe, Ox, Oyster, Pegasus, Pentavite, Pest, Phelddagrif, Phoenix, Pincher, Pirate, Plant, Prism, Rabbit, Rat, Rebel, Reflection, Rhino, Rigger, Rogue, Salamander, Samurai, Sand, Saproling, Satyr, Scarecrow, Scorpion, Scout, Serf, Serpent, Shade, Shaman, Shapeshifter, Sheep, Skeleton, Slith, Sliver, Slug, Snake, Soldier, Soltari, Spawn, Specter, Spellshaper, Sphinx, Spider, Spike, Spirit, Splinter, Sponge, Squid, Squirrel, Starfish, Survivor, Tetravite, Thalakos, Thopter, Thrull, Treefolk, Triskelavite, Troll, Turtle, Unicorn, Vampire, Vedalken, Viashino, Volver, Wall, Warrior, Weird, Whale, Wizard, Wolf, Wolverine, Wombat, Worm, Wraith, Wurm, Yeti, Zombie, Zubera

Creature Type

Creatures and tribals share the same set of subtypes. These subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Creature — Human Soldier," "Artifact Creature — Golem," and so on. These subtypes are also called creature types. The list of creature types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Advisor, Angel, Anteater, Antelope, Ape, Archer, Archon, Artificer, Assassin, Assembly-Worker, Atog, Aurochs, Avatar, Badger, Barbarian, Basilisk, Bat, Bear, Beast, Beeble, Berserker, Bird, Blinkmoth, Boar, Bringer, Brushwagg, Camarid, Camel, Caribou, Carrier, Cat, Centaur, Cephalid, Chimera, Citizen, Cleric, Cockatrice, Construct, Coward, Crab, Crocodile, Cyclops, Dauthi, Demon, Deserter, Devil, Djinn, Dragon, Drake, Dreadnought, Drone, Druid, Dryad, Dwarf, Efreet, Egg, Elder, Elemental, Elephant, Elf, Elk, Eye, Faerie, Ferret, Fish, Flagbearer, Fox, Frog, Fungus, Gargoyle, Giant, Gnome, Goat, Goblin, Golem, Gorgon, Graveborn, Griffin, Hag, Harpy, Hellion, Hippo, Homarid, Homunculus, Horror, Horse, Hound, Human, Hydra, Hyena, Illusion, Imp, Incarnation, Insect, Jellyfish, Juggernaut, Kavu, Kirin, Kithkin, Knight, Kobold, Kor, Kraken, Lammasu, Leech, Leviathan, Lhurgoyf, Licid, Lizard, Manticore, Masticore, Mercenary, Merfolk, Metathran, Minion, Minotaur, Monger, Mongoose, Monk, Moonfolk, Mutant, Myr, Mystic, Nautilus, Nephilim, Nightmare, Nightstalker, Ninja, Nomad, Octopus, Ogre, Ooze, Orb, Orc, Orgg, Ouphe, Ox, Oyster, Pegasus, Pentavite, Pest, Phelddagrif, Phoenix, Pincher, Pirate, Plant, Prism, Rabbit, Rat, Rebel, Reflection, Rhino, Rigger, Rogue, Salamander, Samurai, Sand, Saproling, Satyr, Scarecrow, Scorpion, Scout, Serf, Serpent, Shade, Shaman, Shapeshifter, Sheep, Skeleton, Slith, Sliver, Slug, Snake, Soldier, Soltari, Spawn, Specter, Spellshaper, Sphinx, Spider, Spike, Spirit, Splinter, Sponge, Squid, Squirrel, Starfish, Survivor, Tetravite, Thalakos, Thopter, Thrull, Treefolk, Triskelavite, Troll, Turtle, Unicorn, Vampire, Vedalken, Viashino, Volver, Wall, Warrior, Weird, Whale, Wizard, Wolf, Wolverine, Wombat, Worm, Wraith, Wurm, Yeti, Zombie, Zubera

Enchantment Type

Enchantment subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Enchantment — Shrine." Enchantment subtypes are also called enchantment types. The list of enchantment types, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: Aura, Shrine.

Enchantment Type

Enchantment subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Enchantment — Shrine." Enchantment subtypes are also called enchantment types. The list of enchantment types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Aura, Shrine.

Entwine

Entwine is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Entwine [cost]" means "You may choose to use all modes of this spell instead of just one. If you do, you pay an additional [cost]." When the spell resolves, if the entwine cost was paid, follow the text of each of the modes in the order they're written on the card. See rule 502.32, "Entwine."

Entwine

Entwine is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Entwine [cost]" means "You may choose to use all modes of this spell instead of just one. If you do, you pay an additional [cost]." Using the entwine ability follows the rules for choosing modes and paying additional costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h. When the spell resolves, if the entwine cost was paid, follow the text of each of the modes in the order they're written on the card. See rule 502.32, "Entwine."

Haste

Normally a creature can't attack or use activated abilities with costs that include the tap symbol unless its controller has controlled it continuously since the start of his or her most recent turn. Haste is a static ability that allows a creature to ignore this rule. See rule 502.5, "Haste."

Haste

Normally a creature can't attack or use activated abilities with costs that include the tap symbol ({T}) or the untap symbol ({Q}) unless its controller has controlled it continuously since the start of his or her most recent turn. Haste is a static ability that allows a creature to ignore this rule. See rule 502.5, "Haste."

Hybrid Card

A hybrid card is a card with one or more hybrid mana symbols in its mana cost. The card is all of the colors of its mana symbols. Most hybrid cards costs are printed in a two-tone frame.

Hybrid Mana Symbols

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost which can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. A hybrid mana symbol is each of its component colors.

Hybrid Mana Symbols

Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid in one of two ways, as represented by the two halves of the hybrid mana symbol. {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. Each of the monocolored hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid with one mana of a specific color or two mana of any type. {2/W} can be paid with either one white mana or two mana of any type, {2/U} one blue mana or two mana of any type, {2/B} one black mana or two mana of any type, {2/R} one red mana or two mana of any type, and {2/G} one green mana or two mana of any type. A hybrid mana symbol is all of its component colors. When calculating the converted mana cost of an object with a hybrid mana symbol in its mana cost, use the largest component of each hybrid symbol.

If

See "Intervening 'If' Clause."

If

See Intervening "If" Clause.

Land Type

Land subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Land — Locus, Land — Urza's Mine," etc. Land subtypes are also called land types. Note that "basic," "legendary," and "nonbasic" aren't land types. See rule 212.6, "Lands." See also Basic Land Type. The list of land types, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: Desert, Forest, Island, Lair, Locus, Mine, Mountain, Plains, Power-Plant, Swamp, Tower, Urza's

Land Type

Land subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Land — Locus, Land — Urza's Mine," etc. Land subtypes are also called land types. Note that "basic," "legendary," and "nonbasic" aren't land types. See rule 212.6, "Lands." See also Basic Land Type. The list of land types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Desert, Forest, Island, Lair, Locus, Mine, Mountain, Plains, Power-Plant, Swamp, Tower, Urza's

Mana

Mana is the energy used to play spells and is usually produced by lands. Mana is created by mana abilities (and sometimes by spells), and it can be used to pay costs immediately or can stay in the player's mana pool. See rule 406, "Mana Abilities." Colored mana costs, represented by colored mana symbols, can be paid only with the appropriate color of mana. Generic mana costs can be paid with any color of, or with colorless, mana. See rule 104.3. The spell or ability that adds mana to a mana pool may restrict how it can be used. An ability might produce mana that can be used only to play creature spells or only to pay activation costs. The type of mana a permanent "could produce" is the type of mana that any ability of that permanent can generate, taking into account any applicable replacement effects. If the type of mana can't be defined, there's no type of mana that that permanent could produce. The "type" of mana is its color, or lack thereof (for colorless mana).

Mana

Mana is the resource used to play spells and is usually produced by lands. Mana is created by mana abilities (and sometimes by spells), and it can be used to pay costs immediately or can stay in the player's mana pool. See rule 406, "Mana Abilities." The colors of mana are white, blue, black, red, and green. The types of mana are white, blue, black, red, green, and colorless. Colored mana costs, represented by colored mana symbols, can be paid only with the appropriate color of mana. Generic mana costs can be paid with any color of, or with colorless, mana. See rule 104.3. The spell or ability that adds mana to a mana pool may restrict how it can be used. An ability might produce mana that can be used only to play creature spells or only to pay activation costs. The type of mana a permanent "could produce" at any time includes any type of mana that an ability of that permanent could generate if it were to resolve at that time, taking into account any applicable replacement effects in any possible order. Ignore whether any costs of the ability could be paid. If no type of mana can be defined this way, there's no type of mana that that permanent could produce. To tap a permanent for mana is to play an activated ability of that permanent that includes the {T} symbol in its cost and produces mana as part of its effect.

Mana Symbol

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {X}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; and the snow symbol {S}. See rule 104.3. Each of the colored mana symbols represents one colored mana: {W} white, {U} blue, {B} black, {R} red, and {G} green. See rule 104.3a. Numeral symbols (such as {1}) are generic mana costs and represent an amount of mana that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. See rule 104.3b. The symbol {X} represents an unspecified amount of mana; when playing a spell or activated ability with {X} in its cost, its controller decides the value of that variable. See rule 104.3c. Numeral symbols and variable symbols can also represent colorless mana if they appear in the effect of a spell or of a mana ability that reads "add [mana symbol] to your mana pool" or something similar. See rule 104.3d. The symbol {0} represents zero mana and is used as a placeholder when a spell or activated ability costs nothing to play. A spell or ability whose cost is {0} must still be played the same way as one with a cost greater than zero; it won't play itself automatically. See rule 104.3e. Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost which can be paid with one of two colors: {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. A hybrid mana symbol is each of its component colors. See rule 104.3f. The symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. See rule 104.3h.

Mana Symbol

The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {X}; the numerals {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; the monocolored hybrid symbols {2/W}, {2/U}, {2/B}, {2/R}, and {2/G}; and the snow symbol {S}. See rule 104.3. Each of the colored mana symbols represents one colored mana: {W} white, {U} blue, {B} black, {R} red, and {G} green. See rule 104.3a. Numeral symbols (such as {1}) are generic mana costs and represent an amount of mana that can be paid with any color of, or colorless, mana. See rule 104.3b. The symbol {X} represents an unspecified amount of mana; when playing a spell or activated ability with {X} in its cost, its controller decides the value of that variable. See rule 104.3c. Numeral symbols and variable symbols can also represent colorless mana if they appear in the effect of a spell or of a mana ability that reads "add [mana symbol] to your mana pool" or something similar. See rule 104.3d. The symbol {0} represents zero mana and is used as a placeholder when a spell or activated ability costs nothing to play. A spell or ability whose cost is {0} must still be played the same way as one with a cost greater than zero; it won't play itself automatically. See rule 104.3e. Each of the hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid in one of two ways, as represented by the two halves of the hybrid mana symbol. {W/U} in a cost can be paid with either white or blue mana, {W/B} white or black, {U/B} blue or black, {U/R} blue or red, {B/R} black or red, {B/G} black or green, {R/G} red or green, {R/W} red or white, {G/W} green or white, and {G/U} green or blue. A hybrid mana symbol is each of its component colors. See rule 104.3f. Each of the monocolored hybrid mana symbols represents a cost that can be paid with one mana of a specific color or two mana of any type. {2/W} can be paid with either one white mana or two mana of any type, {2/U} one blue mana or two mana of any type, {2/B} one black mana or two mana of any type, {2/R} one red mana or two mana of any type, and {2/G} one green mana or two mana of any type, See rule 104.3f. The symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana produced by a snow permanent. See rule 104.3h.

Monocolored Hybrid Mana Symbols

See Hybrid Mana Symbols.

Persist

Persist is a triggered ability. "Persist" means "When this permanent is put into a graveyard from play, if it had no -1/-1 counters on it, return it to play under its owner's control with a -1/-1 counter on it." See rule 502.79, "Persist."

Planeswalker Type

Planeswalker subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Planeswalker — Jace." Planeswalker subtypes are also called planeswalker types. The list of planeswalker types, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: Ajani, Chandra, Garruk, Jace, Liliana.

Planeswalker Type

Planeswalker subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Planeswalker — Jace." Planeswalker subtypes are also called planeswalker types. The list of planeswalker types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Ajani, Chandra, Garruk, Jace, Liliana.

Power

Power is a characteristic that only creatures have. The number before the slash printed on the lower right corner of a creature card is its power. See rule 208, "Power/Toughness." Creatures that attack or block assign combat damage equal to their power. See rule 310, "Combat Damage Step." Some creature cards have power represented by * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its power according to some stated condition. This ability functions in all zones. A noncreature permanent has no power, even if it's a card with a power printed on it (such as a Licid that's become an Aura).

Power

Power is a characteristic that only creatures have. The number before the slash printed on the lower right corner of a creature card is its power. See rule 208, "Power/Toughness." Creatures that attack or block assign combat damage equal to their power. See rule 310, "Combat Damage Step." Some creature cards have power represented by * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its power according to some stated condition. This ability functions everywhere, even outside the game. A noncreature permanent has no power, even if it's a card with a power printed on it (such as a Licid that's become an Aura).

Replicate

Replicate is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. The second is a triggered ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Replicate [cost]" means "As an additional cost to play this spell, you may pay [cost] any number of times" and "When you play this spell, if a replicate cost was paid for it, copy it for each time its replicate cost was paid. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for any number of the copies." See rule 502.52, "Replicate."

Replicate

Replicate is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. The second is a triggered ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Replicate [cost]" means "As an additional cost to play this spell, you may pay [cost] any number of times" and "When you play this spell, if a replicate cost was paid for it, copy it for each time its replicate cost was paid. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for any number of the copies." Paying a spell's replicate cost follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h. See rule 502.52, "Replicate."

Spell Type

Instants and sorceries share the same set of subtypes. These subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Instant — Arcane." These subtypes are also called spell types. The list of spell types, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: Arcane.

Spell Type

Instants and sorceries share the same set of subtypes. These subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Instant — Arcane." These subtypes are also called spell types. The list of spell types, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: Arcane.

Summoning Sickness (Informal)

The term "summoning sickness" is an informal term which describes a creature's inability to attack or to use activated abilities that include the tap symbol when it has come under a player's control since the beginning of that player's most recent turn. See rule 212.3f. See also Haste.

Summoning Sickness (Informal)

The term "summoning sickness" is an informal term which describes a creature's inability to attack or to use activated abilities that include the tap symbol or the untap symbol when it has come under a player's control since the beginning of that player's most recent turn. See rule 212.3f. See also Haste.

Supertype

A card can have one or more "supertypes." These are printed directly before its card types. If an object's card types or subtypes change, any supertypes it has are kept, although they may not be relevant to the new card type. See rule 205.4, "Supertypes." An object's supertype is independent of its card type and subtype. Changing an object's card type or subtype won't change its supertype. Changing an object's supertype won't change its card type or subtype. When an object gains or loses a supertype, it retains any other supertypes it had. See rule 212. "Card Type, Supertype, and Subtype." The list of supertypes, updated through the Morningtide set, is as follows: basic, legendary, snow, and world.

Supertype

A card can have one or more "supertypes." These are printed directly before its card types. If an object's card types or subtypes change, any supertypes it has are kept, although they may not be relevant to the new card type. See rule 205.4, "Supertypes." An object's supertype is independent of its card type and subtype. Changing an object's card type or subtype won't change its supertype. Changing an object's supertype won't change its card type or subtype. When an object gains or loses a supertype, it retains any other supertypes it had. See rule 212. "Card Type, Supertype, and Subtype." The list of supertypes, updated through the Shadowmoor set, is as follows: basic, legendary, snow, and world.

Tombstone Icon

A tombstone icon appears to the left of the name of many Odyssey block cards with abilities that are relevant in a player's graveyard. The purpose of the icon is to make those cards stand out when they're in a graveyard. This icon has no effect on game play. See rule 104.5.

Tombstone Icon

A tombstone icon appears to the left of the name of many Odyssey block cards with abilities that are relevant in a player's graveyard. The purpose of the icon is to make those cards stand out when they're in a graveyard. This icon has no effect on game play. See rule 104.6.

Toughness

Toughness is a characteristic that only creatures have. The number after the slash printed on the lower right corner of a creature card is its toughness. See rule 208, "Power/Toughness." A creature that's been dealt damage greater than or equal to its toughness (and greater than 0) has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed. This is a state-based effect; see rule 420. Some creature cards have toughness represented by * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its toughness according to some stated condition. This ability functions in all zones. A noncreature permanent has no toughness, even if it's a card with a toughness printed on it (such as a Licid that's become an Aura).

Toughness

Toughness is a characteristic that only creatures have. The number after the slash printed on the lower right corner of a creature card is its toughness. See rule 208, "Power/Toughness." A creature that's been dealt damage greater than or equal to its toughness (and greater than 0) has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed. This is a state-based effect; see rule 420. Some creature cards have toughness represented by * instead of a number. The object has a characteristic-defining ability that sets its toughness according to some stated condition. This ability functions everywhere, even outside the game. A noncreature permanent has no toughness, even if it's a card with a toughness printed on it (such as a Licid that's become an Aura).

Untap

To untap a tapped card, rotate it back to the upright position. See also Tap, Tapped, and Untapped.

Untap

To untap a permanent is to rotate it back to the upright position. The untap symbol ({Q} in these rules) in an activation cost means "Untap this permanent"-a permanent that's already untapped can't be untapped again to pay the cost. Creatures that haven't been under a player's control continuously since the beginning of his or her most recent turn can't use any ability of theirs with the untap symbol in the cost. See rule 104.5.

Wither

Damage dealt to a creature by a source with wither doesn't stay on that creature (see rule 212.3g). Rather, it causes that many -1/-1 counters to be put on that creature. See rule 502.80, "Wither."